Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-Coated Copper Nanoparticles

Shengyang Yang, Shasha Sun, Chen Zhou, Guiyang Hao, Jinbin Liu, Saleh Ramezani, Mengxiao Yu, Xiankai Sun, Jie Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(Figure Presented) Degradation of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into small molecular complexes is often observed in the physiological environment; however, how this process influences renal clearance of inorganic NPs is largely unknown. By systematically comparing renal clearance of degradable luminescent glutathione coated copper NPs (GS-CuNPs) and their dissociated products, Cu(II)-glutathione disulfide (GSSG) complexes (Cu(II)-GSSG), we found that GS-CuNPs were eliminated through the urinary system surprisingly faster and accumulated in the liver much less than their smaller dissociation counterparts. With assistance of radiochemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we found that the observed "nano size" effect in enhancing renal clearance is attributed to the fact that GS-CuNPs are more resistant to serum protein adsorption than Cu(II)-GSSG. In addition, since dissociation of GS-CuNPs follows zero-order chemical kinetics, their renal clearance and biodistribution also depend on initial injection doses and their dissociation processes. Quantitative understanding of size effect and other factors involved in renal clearance and biodistribution of degradable inorganic NPs will lay down a foundation for further development of renal-clearable inorganic NPs with minimized nanotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-519
Number of pages9
JournalBioconjugate Chemistry
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 2015

Fingerprint

Glutathione Disulfide
Nanoparticles
Glutathione
Copper
Kidney
Degradation
Positron emission tomography
Radiochemistry
Reaction kinetics
Liver
Blood Proteins
Proteins
Imaging techniques
Adsorption
Positron-Emission Tomography
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-Coated Copper Nanoparticles. / Yang, Shengyang; Sun, Shasha; Zhou, Chen; Hao, Guiyang; Liu, Jinbin; Ramezani, Saleh; Yu, Mengxiao; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie.

In: Bioconjugate Chemistry, Vol. 26, No. 3, 18.03.2015, p. 511-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Shengyang ; Sun, Shasha ; Zhou, Chen ; Hao, Guiyang ; Liu, Jinbin ; Ramezani, Saleh ; Yu, Mengxiao ; Sun, Xiankai ; Zheng, Jie. / Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-Coated Copper Nanoparticles. In: Bioconjugate Chemistry. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 511-519.
@article{74f7c5ef70554df9a7271e9d1eaa667d,
title = "Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-Coated Copper Nanoparticles",
abstract = "(Figure Presented) Degradation of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into small molecular complexes is often observed in the physiological environment; however, how this process influences renal clearance of inorganic NPs is largely unknown. By systematically comparing renal clearance of degradable luminescent glutathione coated copper NPs (GS-CuNPs) and their dissociated products, Cu(II)-glutathione disulfide (GSSG) complexes (Cu(II)-GSSG), we found that GS-CuNPs were eliminated through the urinary system surprisingly faster and accumulated in the liver much less than their smaller dissociation counterparts. With assistance of radiochemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we found that the observed {"}nano size{"} effect in enhancing renal clearance is attributed to the fact that GS-CuNPs are more resistant to serum protein adsorption than Cu(II)-GSSG. In addition, since dissociation of GS-CuNPs follows zero-order chemical kinetics, their renal clearance and biodistribution also depend on initial injection doses and their dissociation processes. Quantitative understanding of size effect and other factors involved in renal clearance and biodistribution of degradable inorganic NPs will lay down a foundation for further development of renal-clearable inorganic NPs with minimized nanotoxicity.",
author = "Shengyang Yang and Shasha Sun and Chen Zhou and Guiyang Hao and Jinbin Liu and Saleh Ramezani and Mengxiao Yu and Xiankai Sun and Jie Zheng",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.5b00003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "511--519",
journal = "Bioconjugate Chemistry",
issn = "1043-1802",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-Coated Copper Nanoparticles

AU - Yang, Shengyang

AU - Sun, Shasha

AU - Zhou, Chen

AU - Hao, Guiyang

AU - Liu, Jinbin

AU - Ramezani, Saleh

AU - Yu, Mengxiao

AU - Sun, Xiankai

AU - Zheng, Jie

PY - 2015/3/18

Y1 - 2015/3/18

N2 - (Figure Presented) Degradation of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into small molecular complexes is often observed in the physiological environment; however, how this process influences renal clearance of inorganic NPs is largely unknown. By systematically comparing renal clearance of degradable luminescent glutathione coated copper NPs (GS-CuNPs) and their dissociated products, Cu(II)-glutathione disulfide (GSSG) complexes (Cu(II)-GSSG), we found that GS-CuNPs were eliminated through the urinary system surprisingly faster and accumulated in the liver much less than their smaller dissociation counterparts. With assistance of radiochemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we found that the observed "nano size" effect in enhancing renal clearance is attributed to the fact that GS-CuNPs are more resistant to serum protein adsorption than Cu(II)-GSSG. In addition, since dissociation of GS-CuNPs follows zero-order chemical kinetics, their renal clearance and biodistribution also depend on initial injection doses and their dissociation processes. Quantitative understanding of size effect and other factors involved in renal clearance and biodistribution of degradable inorganic NPs will lay down a foundation for further development of renal-clearable inorganic NPs with minimized nanotoxicity.

AB - (Figure Presented) Degradation of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into small molecular complexes is often observed in the physiological environment; however, how this process influences renal clearance of inorganic NPs is largely unknown. By systematically comparing renal clearance of degradable luminescent glutathione coated copper NPs (GS-CuNPs) and their dissociated products, Cu(II)-glutathione disulfide (GSSG) complexes (Cu(II)-GSSG), we found that GS-CuNPs were eliminated through the urinary system surprisingly faster and accumulated in the liver much less than their smaller dissociation counterparts. With assistance of radiochemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we found that the observed "nano size" effect in enhancing renal clearance is attributed to the fact that GS-CuNPs are more resistant to serum protein adsorption than Cu(II)-GSSG. In addition, since dissociation of GS-CuNPs follows zero-order chemical kinetics, their renal clearance and biodistribution also depend on initial injection doses and their dissociation processes. Quantitative understanding of size effect and other factors involved in renal clearance and biodistribution of degradable inorganic NPs will lay down a foundation for further development of renal-clearable inorganic NPs with minimized nanotoxicity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925448585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925448585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.5b00003

DO - 10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.5b00003

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 511

EP - 519

JO - Bioconjugate Chemistry

JF - Bioconjugate Chemistry

SN - 1043-1802

IS - 3

ER -