Renal neuroendocrine tumors

Brian Lane, George Jour, Ming Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are uncommon tumors that exhibit a wide range of neuroendocrine differentiation and biological behavior. Primary NETs of the kidney, including carcinoid tumor, small cell carcinoma (SCC), and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) are exceedingly rare. Materials and Methods: The clinicopathologic features of renal NETs diagnosed at a single institution were reviewed along with all reported cases in the worldwide literature. Results: Eighty renal NETs have been described, including nine from our institution. Differentiation between renal NETs and the more common renal neoplasms (renal cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma) can be difficult since clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features overlap. Immunohistochemical staining for neuroendocrine markers, such as synaptophysin and chromogranin, can be particularly helpful in this regard. Renal carcinoids are typically slow-growing, may secrete hormones, and pursue a variable clinical course. In contrast, SCC and LCNEC often present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and carry a poor prognosis. Nephrectomy can be curative for clinically localized NETs, but multimodality treatment is indicated for advanced disease. Conclusions: A spectrum of NETs can rarely occur in the kidney. Renal carcinoids have a variable clinical course; SCC and LCNEC are associated with poor clinical outcomes. Diagnosis of NETs, especially LCNEC, requires awareness of their rare occurrence and prudent use of immunohistochemical neuroendocrine markers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-160
Number of pages6
JournalIndian Journal of Urology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Neuroendocrine Tumors
Kidney
Neuroendocrine Carcinoma
Large Cell Carcinoma
Small Cell Carcinoma
Carcinoid Tumor
Chromogranins
Synaptophysin
Transitional Cell Carcinoma
Kidney Neoplasms
Nephrectomy
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Hormones
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • Carcinoid tumor
  • Kidney neoplasm
  • Large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma
  • Metastasis
  • Neuroendocrine tumor
  • Small cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Renal neuroendocrine tumors. / Lane, Brian; Jour, George; Zhou, Ming.

In: Indian Journal of Urology, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.07.2009, p. 155-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lane, B, Jour, G & Zhou, M 2009, 'Renal neuroendocrine tumors', Indian Journal of Urology, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 155-160. https://doi.org/10.4103/0970-1591.52905
Lane, Brian ; Jour, George ; Zhou, Ming. / Renal neuroendocrine tumors. In: Indian Journal of Urology. 2009 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 155-160.
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