Renal oxalate excretion following oral oxalate loads in patients with ileal disease and with renal and absorptive hypercalciurias. Effect of calcium and magnesium

Donald E. Barilla, Constance Notz, Diedre Kennedy, Charles Y C Pak

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Abstract

Intestinal absorption of oxalate was assessed indirectly from the increase in renal oxalate excretion following the oral administration of 5 mmol of stable oxalate. When sodium oxalate alone was given without divalent cations to patients in the fasting state, the urinary oxalate increased promptly (within 2 hours). The increase was more prominent and sustained in those with ileal disease (ileal resection or jujunoileal bypass); thus, 35 per cent of the orally administered oxalate eventually appeared in the urine in the group with ileal disease, 8 per cent in the group with stones (renal and absorptive hypercalciurias) and 9 per cent in the control group. This hyperexcretion of oxalate could be largely, but not totally, ameliorated by the concurrent oral administration of divalent cations. Although urinary oxalate decreased significantly following the oral administration of calcium or magnesium, hyperoxaluria persisted in most patients. The results suggested that the hyperabsorption of oxalate in ileal disease cannot be accounted for solely by an increased absorbable oxalate pool associated with calcium-fatty acid complexation. Moreover, although urinary oxalate decreased, urinary calcium increased concurrently when either calcium or magnesium was given. Thus, there was no significant change or increase in the urinary state of saturation with respect to calcium oxalate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-585
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978

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Ileal Diseases
Oxalates
Magnesium
Calcium
Kidney
Oral Administration
Divalent Cations
Renal Elimination
Hyperoxaluria
Oxalic Acid
Calcium Oxalate
Intestinal Absorption
Fasting
Fatty Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Renal oxalate excretion following oral oxalate loads in patients with ileal disease and with renal and absorptive hypercalciurias. Effect of calcium and magnesium. / Barilla, Donald E.; Notz, Constance; Kennedy, Diedre; Pak, Charles Y C.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 64, No. 4, 1978, p. 579-585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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