Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy: Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

Philip Raskin, Lois Jovanovic, Sheldon Berger, Sherwyn Schwartz, Vincent Woo, Robert Ratner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - This multicenter open-label clinical trial compared the efficacy and safety of repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy, repaglinide monotherapy, and troglitazone monotherapy in type 2 diabetes that had been inadequately controlled by sulfonylureas, acarbose, or metformin alone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 256) who had inadequate glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥7.0%) during previous monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive repaglinide (0.5-4.0 mg at meals), troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily), or a combination of repaglinide (1-4 mg at meals) and troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily). After a 4-6 week washout period, the trial assessed 22 weeks of treatment: 3 weeks (weeks 0-2) of forced titration, 11 weeks of fixed-dose treatment (weeks 3-13), and 8 weeks (weeks 14-21) of titration to maximum dose changes in HbA(1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values were measured. RESULTS - The combination therapy showed a significant reduction in mean HbA(1c) values (-1.7%) that was greater than with either type of monotherapy. Repaglinide monotherapy resulted in a reduction of HbA(1c) values that was significantly greater than troglitazone (-0.8 vs. -0.4%) (P < 0.05). Combination therapy was more effective in reducing FPG values (-80 mg/dl) than either repaglinide (-43 mg/dl) or troglitazone (-46 mg/dl) monotherapies. Adverse events were similar in all groups. CONCLUSIONS - Combination therapy with repaglinide and troglitazone leads to better glycemic control than monotherapy with either agent alone. Repaglinide monotherapy was more effective in lowering HbA(1c) levels than troglitazone monotherapy Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy was effective and did not show unexpected adverse events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)979-983
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume23
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2000

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repaglinide
troglitazone
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Therapeutics
Meals
Fasting
Acarbose
Glucose
Metformin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Raskin, P., Jovanovic, L., Berger, S., Schwartz, S., Woo, V., & Ratner, R. (2000). Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy: Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 23(7), 979-983.

Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy : Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. / Raskin, Philip; Jovanovic, Lois; Berger, Sheldon; Schwartz, Sherwyn; Woo, Vincent; Ratner, Robert.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 23, No. 7, 2000, p. 979-983.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raskin, P, Jovanovic, L, Berger, S, Schwartz, S, Woo, V & Ratner, R 2000, 'Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy: Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 23, no. 7, pp. 979-983.
Raskin P, Jovanovic L, Berger S, Schwartz S, Woo V, Ratner R. Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy: Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2000;23(7):979-983.
Raskin, Philip ; Jovanovic, Lois ; Berger, Sheldon ; Schwartz, Sherwyn ; Woo, Vincent ; Ratner, Robert. / Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy : Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2000 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 979-983.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE - This multicenter open-label clinical trial compared the efficacy and safety of repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy, repaglinide monotherapy, and troglitazone monotherapy in type 2 diabetes that had been inadequately controlled by sulfonylureas, acarbose, or metformin alone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 256) who had inadequate glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥7.0{\%}) during previous monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive repaglinide (0.5-4.0 mg at meals), troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily), or a combination of repaglinide (1-4 mg at meals) and troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily). After a 4-6 week washout period, the trial assessed 22 weeks of treatment: 3 weeks (weeks 0-2) of forced titration, 11 weeks of fixed-dose treatment (weeks 3-13), and 8 weeks (weeks 14-21) of titration to maximum dose changes in HbA(1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values were measured. RESULTS - The combination therapy showed a significant reduction in mean HbA(1c) values (-1.7{\%}) that was greater than with either type of monotherapy. Repaglinide monotherapy resulted in a reduction of HbA(1c) values that was significantly greater than troglitazone (-0.8 vs. -0.4{\%}) (P < 0.05). Combination therapy was more effective in reducing FPG values (-80 mg/dl) than either repaglinide (-43 mg/dl) or troglitazone (-46 mg/dl) monotherapies. Adverse events were similar in all groups. CONCLUSIONS - Combination therapy with repaglinide and troglitazone leads to better glycemic control than monotherapy with either agent alone. Repaglinide monotherapy was more effective in lowering HbA(1c) levels than troglitazone monotherapy Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy was effective and did not show unexpected adverse events.",
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T2 - Improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

AU - Raskin, Philip

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AU - Woo, Vincent

AU - Ratner, Robert

PY - 2000

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N2 - OBJECTIVE - This multicenter open-label clinical trial compared the efficacy and safety of repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy, repaglinide monotherapy, and troglitazone monotherapy in type 2 diabetes that had been inadequately controlled by sulfonylureas, acarbose, or metformin alone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 256) who had inadequate glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥7.0%) during previous monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive repaglinide (0.5-4.0 mg at meals), troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily), or a combination of repaglinide (1-4 mg at meals) and troglitazone (200-600 mg once daily). After a 4-6 week washout period, the trial assessed 22 weeks of treatment: 3 weeks (weeks 0-2) of forced titration, 11 weeks of fixed-dose treatment (weeks 3-13), and 8 weeks (weeks 14-21) of titration to maximum dose changes in HbA(1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values were measured. RESULTS - The combination therapy showed a significant reduction in mean HbA(1c) values (-1.7%) that was greater than with either type of monotherapy. Repaglinide monotherapy resulted in a reduction of HbA(1c) values that was significantly greater than troglitazone (-0.8 vs. -0.4%) (P < 0.05). Combination therapy was more effective in reducing FPG values (-80 mg/dl) than either repaglinide (-43 mg/dl) or troglitazone (-46 mg/dl) monotherapies. Adverse events were similar in all groups. CONCLUSIONS - Combination therapy with repaglinide and troglitazone leads to better glycemic control than monotherapy with either agent alone. Repaglinide monotherapy was more effective in lowering HbA(1c) levels than troglitazone monotherapy Repaglinide/troglitazone combination therapy was effective and did not show unexpected adverse events.

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