Report of stroke-like symptoms predicts incident cognitive impairment in a stroke-free cohort

Brendan J. Kelley, Leslie A. McClure, Abraham J. Letter, Virginia G. Wadley, Frederick W. Unverzagt, Brett M. Kissela, Dawn Kleindorfer, George Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study characterizes the relationship between report of stroke symptoms (SS) or TIA and incident cognitive impairment in the large biracial cohort of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. Methods: The REGARDS Study is a population-based, biracial, longitudinal cohort study that has enrolled 30,239 participants from the United States. Exclusion of those with baseline cognitive impairment, stroke before enrollment, or incomplete data resulted in a sample size of 23,830. Participants reported SS/TIA on the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status at baseline and every 6 months during follow-up. Incident cognitive impairment was detected using the Six-item Screener, which was administered annually. Results: Logistic regression found significant association between report of SS/TIA and subsequent incident cognitive impairment. Among white participants, the odds ratio for incident cognitive impairment was 2.08 (95% confidence interval: 1.81, 2.39) for those reporting at least one SS/TIA compared with those reporting no SS/TIA. Among black participants, the odds ratio was 1.66 (95% confidence interval: 1.45, 1.89) using the same modeling. The magnitude of impact was largest among those with fewer traditional stroke risk factors, particularly among white participants. Conclusions: Report of SS/TIA showed a strong association with incident cognitive impairment and supports the use of the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-free Status as a quick, low-cost instrument to screen for people at increased risk of cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-118
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 2013

Fingerprint

Stroke
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognitive Impairment
Cohort
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Sample Size
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Kelley, B. J., McClure, L. A., Letter, A. J., Wadley, V. G., Unverzagt, F. W., Kissela, B. M., ... Howard, G. (2013). Report of stroke-like symptoms predicts incident cognitive impairment in a stroke-free cohort. Neurology, 81(2), 113-118. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829a352e

Report of stroke-like symptoms predicts incident cognitive impairment in a stroke-free cohort. / Kelley, Brendan J.; McClure, Leslie A.; Letter, Abraham J.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Howard, George.

In: Neurology, Vol. 81, No. 2, 09.07.2013, p. 113-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kelley, BJ, McClure, LA, Letter, AJ, Wadley, VG, Unverzagt, FW, Kissela, BM, Kleindorfer, D & Howard, G 2013, 'Report of stroke-like symptoms predicts incident cognitive impairment in a stroke-free cohort', Neurology, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 113-118. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829a352e
Kelley, Brendan J. ; McClure, Leslie A. ; Letter, Abraham J. ; Wadley, Virginia G. ; Unverzagt, Frederick W. ; Kissela, Brett M. ; Kleindorfer, Dawn ; Howard, George. / Report of stroke-like symptoms predicts incident cognitive impairment in a stroke-free cohort. In: Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 113-118.
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