Resection of pulmonary metastases from nonseminomatous testicular tumors: Correlation of clinical and histological features with treatment outcome

C. D. Callery, E. C. Holmes, S. Vernon, J. Huth, W. F. Coulson, D. G. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinical and histological correlates of survival in patients undergoing complete resection of pulmonary metastases from nonseminomatous testicular carcinoma were determined in 25 Stage C patients aged 17–38 years treated from 1969–1978. All patients had orchiectomy and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. Nineteen patients received combination chemotherapy before resection, and all received chemotherapy after resection. Three patients had four additional thoracotomies for pulmonary recurrence. Survival was measured from time of first thoracotomy to time of last followup or death. Actuarial survival for the entire group at one, two, and five years was 80, 63, and 59%, respectively. Median follow‐up of the survivors was 3.5 years. Patients in low tumor burden groups such as those with no tumor in retroperitoneal nodes, with unilateral metastases, or with single metastases had better prognosis, as did patients whose primary tumors were moderately well differentiated. Characteristics of pulmonary metastases that favorably influenced the prognosis were the presence of mature teratoma, presence of few mitoses, lack of mononuclear infiltrate, and lack of desmoplastic response. These findings confirm the effectiveness of multimodality therapy which includes the resection of pulmonary metastases for Stage C nonseminomatous carcinoma of the testes. In addition, they suggest that consideration should be given to the stratification of prospective clinical trials on the basis of tumor burden and histologic characteristics of the primary and metastatic lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1152-1158
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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