Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats

Shin Yamazaki, Rika Numano, Michikazu Abe, Akiko Hida, Ri Ichi Takahashi, Masatsugu Ueda, Gene D. Block, Yoshiyuki Sakaki, Michael Menaker, Hajime Tei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1293 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, circadian oscillators are organized into multitissue systems which function as biological clocks that regulate the activities of the organism in relation to environmental cycles and provide an internal temporal framework. To investigate the organization of a mammalian circadian system, we constructed a transgenic rat line in which luciferase is rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter. Light emission from cultured suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of these rats was invariably and robustly rhythmic and persisted for up to 32 days in vitro. Liver, lung, and skeletal muscle also expressed circadian rhythms, which damped after two to seven cycles in vitro. In response to advances and delays of the environmental light cycle, the circadian rhythm of light emission from the SCN shifted more rapidly than did the rhythm of locomotor behavior or the rhythms in peripheral tissues. We hypothesize that a self-sustained circadian pacemaker in the SCN entrains circadian oscillators in the periphery to maintain adaptive phase control, which is temporarily lost following large, abrupt shifts in the environmental light cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)682-685
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume288
Issue number5466
StatePublished - Apr 28 2000

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Transgenic Rats
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Photoperiod
Circadian Rhythm
Biological Clocks
Light
Luciferases
Skeletal Muscle
Lung
Liver
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Yamazaki, S., Numano, R., Abe, M., Hida, A., Takahashi, R. I., Ueda, M., ... Tei, H. (2000). Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats. Science, 288(5466), 682-685.

Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats. / Yamazaki, Shin; Numano, Rika; Abe, Michikazu; Hida, Akiko; Takahashi, Ri Ichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Block, Gene D.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Menaker, Michael; Tei, Hajime.

In: Science, Vol. 288, No. 5466, 28.04.2000, p. 682-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamazaki, S, Numano, R, Abe, M, Hida, A, Takahashi, RI, Ueda, M, Block, GD, Sakaki, Y, Menaker, M & Tei, H 2000, 'Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats', Science, vol. 288, no. 5466, pp. 682-685.
Yamazaki S, Numano R, Abe M, Hida A, Takahashi RI, Ueda M et al. Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats. Science. 2000 Apr 28;288(5466):682-685.
Yamazaki, Shin ; Numano, Rika ; Abe, Michikazu ; Hida, Akiko ; Takahashi, Ri Ichi ; Ueda, Masatsugu ; Block, Gene D. ; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki ; Menaker, Michael ; Tei, Hajime. / Resetting central and peripheral circadian oscillators in transgenic rats. In: Science. 2000 ; Vol. 288, No. 5466. pp. 682-685.
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