Residency training in emergency medicine: The challenges of the 21st century

Annette L. Williams, Andra L. Blomkalns, W. Brian Gibler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emergency Medicine is a relatively young specialty in the United States as well as in other parts of the world. It was only 36 years ago, in 1968, that the American College of Emergency Physicians was founded. Two years later, the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA launched the first Emergency Medicine Residency Training Program. Until the inception of this program, staffing of "Emergency Rooms" consisted largely of physicians who were not trained in the specialty of Emergency Medicine. Emergency Medicine Residency training programs fulfill the need to have Emergency Medicine trained physicians staffing Emergency Departments. There are three and four year training formats for Emergency Medicine in the United States. The University of Cincinnati program is a full four-year program, which teaches residents to master the many diagnostic, procedural, and interpersonal skills required of Emergency Medicine physicians. Diagnostic skills must encompass the pathology affecting all organ systems in all age groups and both sexes. Procedural skills include airway management, vascular access, cavity access, and wound repair. Interpersonal skills are demanding as well, requiring leadership/management of the Emergency Department care team, immediate patient rapport, and dealing with patient/family grief. The Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) ensures that all programs have a structured curriculum complete with both didactic and bedside teaching, as well as structured methods for evaluation of both residents and faculty. According to manpower studies, a great need still exists for Emergency Physicians in many United States hospitals, particularly in rural communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalKeio Journal of Medicine
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Fingerprint

Emergency Medicine
Internship and Residency
Physicians
Hospital Emergency Service
Graduate Medical Education
Education
State Hospitals
Airway Management
Grief
Accreditation
Emergency Medical Services
Rural Population
Advisory Committees
Curriculum
Blood Vessels
Teaching
Emergencies
Age Groups
Pathology
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Emergency medicine
  • Residency
  • Specialty training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Residency training in emergency medicine : The challenges of the 21st century. / Williams, Annette L.; Blomkalns, Andra L.; Gibler, W. Brian.

In: Keio Journal of Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 4, 01.12.2004, p. 203-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Williams, Annette L. ; Blomkalns, Andra L. ; Gibler, W. Brian. / Residency training in emergency medicine : The challenges of the 21st century. In: Keio Journal of Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 53, No. 4. pp. 203-209.
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