Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus is the major respiratory pathogen of infants and children worldwide. Currently, there is no effective vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus infection. Immunoprophylaxis with hyperimmune globulin or with a humanized monoclonal antibody is expensive, limited to children with underlying disease, and not practical for general use. Antiviral therapy is controversial and of limited effectiveness. New approaches to the development of a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus infection are promising. Several subunit vaccines and live attenuated virus vaccines are immunogenic and safe in children and adults. This review focuses on potential vaccine candidates and the challenges these candidate vaccines must overcome. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-262
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines
Vaccines
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Attenuated Vaccines
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Subunit Vaccines
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Globulins
Antiviral Agents
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development. / Kahn, Jeffrey.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2000, p. 257-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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