Responding to directional cues: A tale of two cells

Saurabh Paliwal, Lan Ma, J. Krishnan, Andre Levchenko, Pablo A. Iglesias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through the process known as chemotaxis, unicellular organisms such as Dictyostellium discoideum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae hunt for food as well as survive when faced with harsh environmental conditions. D. discoideum uses negative feedback to remain responsive to wide changes in the mean level of chemoattractant, whereas S. cerevisiae uses positive feedback loops to stabilize the polarization orientation. These two biochemical signaling pathways use control and dynamical systems theory. Both pathways illustrate traditional control engineering tasks, including step disturbance rejection and amplification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-90
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE Control Systems Magazine
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Saccharomyces Cerevisiae
Yeast
Feedback
Positive Feedback
Negative Feedback
Signaling Pathways
Disturbance Rejection
Chemotaxis
Disturbance rejection
Cell
Feedback Loop
System theory
Systems Theory
Amplification
Pathway
Dynamical systems
Polarization
Dynamical system
Control System
Engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Paliwal, S., Ma, L., Krishnan, J., Levchenko, A., & Iglesias, P. A. (2004). Responding to directional cues: A tale of two cells. IEEE Control Systems Magazine, 24(4), 77-90. https://doi.org/10.1109/MCS.2004.1316655

Responding to directional cues : A tale of two cells. / Paliwal, Saurabh; Ma, Lan; Krishnan, J.; Levchenko, Andre; Iglesias, Pablo A.

In: IEEE Control Systems Magazine, Vol. 24, No. 4, 08.2004, p. 77-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paliwal, S, Ma, L, Krishnan, J, Levchenko, A & Iglesias, PA 2004, 'Responding to directional cues: A tale of two cells', IEEE Control Systems Magazine, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 77-90. https://doi.org/10.1109/MCS.2004.1316655
Paliwal S, Ma L, Krishnan J, Levchenko A, Iglesias PA. Responding to directional cues: A tale of two cells. IEEE Control Systems Magazine. 2004 Aug;24(4):77-90. https://doi.org/10.1109/MCS.2004.1316655
Paliwal, Saurabh ; Ma, Lan ; Krishnan, J. ; Levchenko, Andre ; Iglesias, Pablo A. / Responding to directional cues : A tale of two cells. In: IEEE Control Systems Magazine. 2004 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 77-90.
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