Restenosis after Carotid Endarterectomy: Insight into Risk Factors and Modification of Postoperative Management

Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Wuyang Yang, Xiaoming Rong, Justin M. Caplan, Xiaobu Ye, Geoffrey P. Colby, Alexander L. Coon, Rafael J. Tamargo, Judy Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Restenosis after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a potential complication after surgery for carotid stenosis. Stroke after CEA is a debilitating complication secondary to restenosis, and modification of postoperative care may be necessary to decrease the incidence of postoperative stroke after CEA. We sought to identify the clinical and patient factors that are associated with this complication. Methods A retrospective analysis of all neurosurgical patients who underwent CEA for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis was performed. Factors were compared against the outcome variable in a univariate analysis. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify independent predictive variables. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare the effect of the variables on long-term event-free survival. Results A total of 273 CEA procedures and their outcomes were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 50.7 months. Twenty-one patients had restenosis (7.6%). Rates of restenosis and restenosis-free survival were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves (log-rank test). In the multivariate model, a family history of stroke was the only variable that was significantly associated with restenosis after CEA. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a family history of stroke is an important factor that predisposes patients to restenosis after CEA. Restenosis-free survival is influenced by the presence of hyperlipidemia, age, and family history of stroke. Closer surveillance with more frequent follow-up and multidisciplinary management may be beneficial in patients who have these risk factors to prevent restenosis and prolong restenosis-free survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-167
Number of pages9
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume89
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carotid Endarterectomy
Stroke
Carotid Stenosis
Survival
Logistic Models
Postoperative Care
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Hyperlipidemias
Disease-Free Survival
Incidence

Keywords

  • Carotid endarterectomy
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Restenosis
  • Risk factors
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Restenosis after Carotid Endarterectomy : Insight into Risk Factors and Modification of Postoperative Management. / Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Yang, Wuyang; Rong, Xiaoming; Caplan, Justin M.; Ye, Xiaobu; Colby, Geoffrey P.; Coon, Alexander L.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Huang, Judy.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 89, 05.2016, p. 159-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas ; Yang, Wuyang ; Rong, Xiaoming ; Caplan, Justin M. ; Ye, Xiaobu ; Colby, Geoffrey P. ; Coon, Alexander L. ; Tamargo, Rafael J. ; Huang, Judy. / Restenosis after Carotid Endarterectomy : Insight into Risk Factors and Modification of Postoperative Management. In: World Neurosurgery. 2016 ; Vol. 89. pp. 159-167.
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