Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta: simulation improves performance but may require interval training to prevent skill degradation

Caroline Park, Jennifer L. Grant, Priya Garigipati, Kali Kuhlenschmidt, George Black, Sneha Bhat, Kareem Abdelfattah, Michael Cripps, Ryan P. Dumas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Surgical trainees are exposed to less procedures with increasing need for simulation. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has become increasingly implemented for hemorrhage control, yet most courses are catered to faculty level with little data on trainees. We propose that routine training in this critical procedure will improve trainee performance over time. Methods: This is a prospective, observational study at a level I trauma center involving a monthly trauma procedural program. Early in the month, trainees received hands-on REBOA training; at the end, trainees underwent standardized, class-based evaluation on a perfused trainer. Score percentages were recorded (0–100%). Endpoints included early, mid and late performance (2–12 months). Paired T-test and Pearson’s coefficient were used to evaluate differences and strength of association between time between training and performance. Results: 25 trainees participated with 5 and 11 repeat learners in the PGY-2 and PGY-3 classes, respectively. Median early performance score was 62.5% (IQR 56–81) for PGY-2s and 91.6% (IQR 75–100) in PGY-3s. Pearson’s coefficient between time between and training and score demonstrated a weak correlation in the PGY-2s (r2 = − 0.13), but was more pronounced in the PGY-3s (r2 = − 0.44) with an inflection point at 5 months. Conclusions: Routine REBOA training in trainees is associated with improvement in performance within a short period of time. Skill degradation was most pronounced in trainees who did not receive training for more than 5 months. Trainees can be successfully trained in REBOA; however, this should be done at shorter intervals to prevent skill degradation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta
  • Simulation
  • Surgical training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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