Reversal of retinal and optic disc ischemia in a patient with sickle cell trait and glaucoma secondary to traumatic hyphema

M. B. Wax, M. E. Ridley, L. E. Magargal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 14-year-old black boy with sickle cell trait, who sustained a traumatic hyphema, developed moderately elevated intraocular pressure that failed to respond to carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and osmotic agents. On the tenth postinjury day, a sudden increased cupping of the optic disc and partial central retinal artery obstruction caused painless loss of vision. Reversal of the cupping, the retinal ischemia, and the intraocular pressure was documented following anterior chamber paracentesis, and visual acuity returned to 6/6. Pathophysiology of the posterior ischemia is discussed. This case documents the potentially debilitating course of traumatic hyphema in 'benign' sickle cell trait and its avoidance with proper management. The authors endorse recent suggestions for careful observation of any sickle cell patient with traumatic hyphema, and recommend anterior chamber paracentesis, supplemental oxygen, and avoidance of osmotic agents, if secondary glaucoma develops following the initial trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-851
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Trait
Hyphema
Optic Disk
Glaucoma
Paracentesis
Ischemia
Anterior Chamber
Intraocular Pressure
Retinal Artery
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
Visual Acuity
Observation
Oxygen
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Reversal of retinal and optic disc ischemia in a patient with sickle cell trait and glaucoma secondary to traumatic hyphema. / Wax, M. B.; Ridley, M. E.; Magargal, L. E.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 89, No. 7, 1982, p. 845-851.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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