Rheumatoid arthritis medications and lactation

Lisa R. Sammaritano, Bonnie L. Bermas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In contrast to the disease remission enjoyed by a majority of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients during pregnancy, the immediate postpartum period is generally characterized by flare. Managing symptoms during this time is challenging because the potential transfer of medication into the breast milk of nursing mothers may limit which antirheumatic drugs can be safely used. The benefits of breastfeeding are significant, however, so an understanding of how to adjust medications to permit lactation and nursing is important for rheumatologists. RECENT FINDINGS: Although nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in general are passed into milk in low doses, shorter acting NSAIDs are preferred, with caution for premature infants. Prednisone can be taken by nursing mothers, although when used at doses higher than 20âS mg/day an interval of 4âSh after dosing and prior to breastfeeding is recommended. Hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine are compatible with nursing. Cyclosporine is generally allowed in lactating women, although a single infant was reported to develop therapeutic drug levels. Azathioprine (AZA) and tissue necrosis factor-α-inhibitors have little to no transfer into breast milk, with negligible levels measured in infant sera, and thus may be considered for use in lactating mothers. Methotrexate and leflunomide should not be used. Other biological RA medications have not been evaluated, and are, therefore, best avoided by breastfeeding patients. SUMMARY: Many but not all RA medications may be used during lactation with low risk to the nursing infant; this review summarizes the available data for commonly used medications in order to help guide therapy during the postpartum period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-360
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Rheumatology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Lactation
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Nursing
Breast Feeding
leflunomide
Mothers
Human Milk
Postpartum Period
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hydroxychloroquine
Sulfasalazine
Antirheumatic Agents
Azathioprine
Thromboplastin
Prednisone
Premature Infants
Methotrexate
Cyclosporine
Milk

Keywords

  • biologics
  • disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
  • lactation
  • nonsteroidal antiinflammatory druges (NSAIDs)
  • rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Rheumatoid arthritis medications and lactation. / Sammaritano, Lisa R.; Bermas, Bonnie L.

In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 354-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sammaritano, Lisa R. ; Bermas, Bonnie L. / Rheumatoid arthritis medications and lactation. In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 354-360.
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