Risk-reducing mastectomy decisions among women with mutations in high- and moderate- penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes

Jacob G. Comeaux, Julie O. Culver, John E. Lee, Danielle Dondanville, Heather L. McArthur, Emily Quinn, Nicholas Gorman, Charité Ricker, Ming Li, Caryn Lerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Women harboring mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes are at increased lifetime risk of developing breast cancer and are faced with decisions about risk management, including whether to undergo high-risk screening or risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). National guidelines recommend BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers consider RRM, but that carriers of moderate penetrance mutations (e.g., ATM or CHEK2) should be managed based on family history. We aimed to investigate determinants of decision for RRM, and hypothesized that mutation status, age, family history, partner status, and breast cancer would impact RRM decision making. Methods: We performed a retrospective study assessing RRM decisions for 279 women. Results: Women with BRCA and moderate penetrance gene mutations, a personal history of breast cancer, or a first degree relative with a history of breast cancer were more likely to undergo RRM. Breast cancer status and age showed an interaction effect such that women with breast cancer were less likely to undergo RRM with increasing age. Conclusion: Although national guidelines do not recommend RRM for moderate penetrance carriers, the rates of RRM for this population approached those for BRCA mutation carriers. Further insights are needed to better support RRM decision-making in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMolecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • BRCA1/2
  • breast cancer
  • decision-making
  • mastectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Risk-reducing mastectomy decisions among women with mutations in high- and moderate- penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this