Role of creatine in the regulation of cardiac protein synthesis

J. S. Ingwall, K. Wildenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These experiments indicate that creatine, an end product of contraction unique to muscle, stimulates muscle specific protein synthesis in the intact beating fetal mouse heart in organ culture. In hearts supplied with creatine (5 mM), the incorporation of labeled precursor into myosin heavy chain, the major contractile protein, was stimulated 21% and the activity of creatine phosphokinase, a muscle specific enzyme, was stimulated 14%. In contrast, the incorporation of labeled precursor into total cardiac protein was stimulated only 6% and the activities of several nonmyofibrillar enzymes (lactic dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and cathepsin D) were not altered significantly. These results suggest that creatine preferentially stimulates the synthesis of cardiac muscle specific proteins in vitro and support the hypothesis that creatine may play a role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-163
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume68
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1976

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Creatine
Muscle Proteins
Proteins
Contractile Proteins
Fetal Heart
Muscles
Cathepsin D
Myosin Heavy Chains
Organ Culture Techniques
Cardiomegaly
Enzymes
Creatine Kinase
Acid Phosphatase
Lactic Acid
Myocardium
Oxidoreductases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Ingwall, J. S., & Wildenthal, K. (1976). Role of creatine in the regulation of cardiac protein synthesis. Journal of Cell Biology, 68(1), 159-163.

Role of creatine in the regulation of cardiac protein synthesis. / Ingwall, J. S.; Wildenthal, K.

In: Journal of Cell Biology, Vol. 68, No. 1, 1976, p. 159-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ingwall, JS & Wildenthal, K 1976, 'Role of creatine in the regulation of cardiac protein synthesis', Journal of Cell Biology, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 159-163.
Ingwall, J. S. ; Wildenthal, K. / Role of creatine in the regulation of cardiac protein synthesis. In: Journal of Cell Biology. 1976 ; Vol. 68, No. 1. pp. 159-163.
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