Safety and Efficacy of Ceftriaxone in the Treatment of Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: A Noninferiority Retrospective Cohort Study

Anisha Ganguly, Carolina de la Flor, Kristin Alvarez, L. Steven Brown, Norman S. Mang, Jillian Smartt, Helen King, Trish M. Perl, Hector Filizola, Kavita P. Bhavan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Antistaphylococcal penicillins and cefazolin are the treatments of choice for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections, requiring multiple doses daily. At Parkland, eligible uninsured patients with MSSA bloodstream infections (BSI) receive self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (S-OPAT). Ceftriaxone was used in a cohort of S-OPAT patients for ease of once-daily dosing. Objective: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate clinical outcomes for patients discharged with ceftriaxone versus cefazolin to treat MSSA BSI. Methods: A retrospective cohort noninferiority study design was used to assess treatment efficacy of ceftriaxone versus cefazolin among Parkland S-OPAT patients treated from April 2012 to March 2020. Demographic, clinical, and treatment-related adverse events data were collected. Clinical outcomes included treatment failure as defined by repeat positive blood culture or retreatment within 6 months, all-cause 30-day readmission rates, and central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates. Results: Of 368 S-OPAT patients with MSSA BSI, 286 (77.7%) received cefazolin, and 82 (22.3%) received ceftriaxone. Demographics and comorbidities were similar for both groups. There were no treatment failures in the ceftriaxone group compared with 4 (1%) in the cefazolin group (P = 0.58). No difference in 30-day readmission rate between groups was found. The CLABSI rates were lower in ceftriaxone group (2%) compared with cefazolin (11%; P = 0.02). Limitations include retrospective cohort design. Conclusions: Ceftriaxone was found to be noninferior to cefazolin in this study. Our findings suggest that ceftriaxone is a safe and effective treatment of MSSA BSI secondary to osteoarticular or skin and soft tissue infections when used in the S-OPAT setting. Poster abstract: OFID on 2018 Nov; 5(Suppl 1): S316: doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofy210.894.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Pharmacotherapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • bloodstream infections
  • cefazolin
  • ceftriaxone
  • MSSA
  • noninferiority study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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