Schizophrenia-Relevant Behavioral Testing in Rodent Models: A Uniquely Human Disorder?

Craig M. Powell, Tsuyoshi Miyakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

230 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animal models are extremely useful tools in defining pathogenesis and treatment of human disease. Creating adequate animal models of complex neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia represents a particularly difficult challenge. In the case of schizophrenia, little is certain regarding the etiology or pathophysiology of the human disease. In addition, many symptoms of the disorder are difficult to measure directly in rodents. These challenges have not daunted neuroscientists who are capitalizing on even subtle overlaps between this uniquely human disorder and rodent behavior. In this perspective, we detail the features of ideal animal models of schizophrenia, the potential utility of such models, and the rodent behaviors used to model certain aspects of schizophrenia. The development of such models will provide critical tools to understand the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and novel insights into therapeutic approaches to this complex disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1198-1207
Number of pages10
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume59
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2006

Keywords

  • Schizophrenia
  • animal model
  • behavior
  • genetic
  • knockout
  • psychosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

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