Schizophrenia: Treatment targets beyond monoamine systems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We develop the proposal in this review that schizophrenia is a syndrome made up of component symptom complexes, each with distinctive clinical correlates, pathophysiology, and selective treatments. Psychosis is the necessary component of the syndrome; it has a young-adult onset and is sensitive to current antipsychotic drugs. Cognitive dysfunction often precedes psychosis onset, does not present an episodic course, and is poorly responsive to antipsychotic drugs. Treatments for cognition are being developed largely on the basis of animal pharmacology. Drugs for component symptom complexes will theoretically be coadministered to independent symptomatic end points. Animal models, some with genetic characteristics, can be more easily and directly developed to match an individual component than to match an illness definition as broad as schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-209
Number of pages21
JournalAnnual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Volume51
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2011

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Psychotic Disorders
Antipsychotic Agents
Schizophrenia
Animals
Cognition
Young Adult
Animal Models
Pharmacology
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • acetylcholine
  • cognition
  • component symptom complexes
  • glutamate
  • psychosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Schizophrenia : Treatment targets beyond monoamine systems. / Ibrahim, Hisham M.; Tamminga, Carol A.

In: Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Vol. 51, 10.02.2011, p. 189-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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