Sclerotic fibroma-like change in various neoplastic and inflammatory skin lesions: Is sclerotic fibroma a distinct entity?

Whitney A. High, David Stewart, Lydia R. Essary, Nicole P. Kageyama, Mai P. Hoang, Clay J. Cockerell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sclerotic fibroma was first described in association with Cowden's disease by Weary et al. in 1972. In 1989, Rapini and Golitz detailed 11 cases of solitary sclerotic fibroma (SFS) in the absence of Cowden's disease, suggesting the term SFS of the skin. Classic histological features include hypocellular, hyalinized bands of collagen sharply demarcated from the surrounding skin. Numerous authors have described sclerotic fibroma-like changes in other entities including melanocytic nevi, dermatofibromas, lipomas, tendon sheath fibromas, giant cell collagenomas, neurofibromas, angiofibromas, erythema elevatum diutinum, and folliculitis. Dissension has arisen, with some dermatopathologists asserting that sclerotic fibroma is just an evolutionary end-point of a previous lesion. Others contend that SFS is a distinct lesion and cite recurrent cases and/or proliferation marker studies to corroborate this view. We detail the histopathological findings of lesions consistent with the classic description of SFS and compare these to sclerotic changes observed in an intradermal nevus, blue nevus, erythema elevatum diutinum, neurofollicular hamartoma, angiofibroma, neurofibroma, accessory nipple, and dermatofibromas. Sclerotic fibroma-like change may be seen in a variety of lesions and may represent a common reaction pattern in the skin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-378
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cutaneous Pathology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Fibroma
Skin
Multiple Hamartoma Syndrome
Angiofibroma
Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma
Neurofibroma
Intradermal Nevus
Blue Nevus
Folliculitis
Pigmented Nevus
Hamartoma
Lipoma
Giant Cells
Tendons
Collagen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Sclerotic fibroma-like change in various neoplastic and inflammatory skin lesions : Is sclerotic fibroma a distinct entity? / High, Whitney A.; Stewart, David; Essary, Lydia R.; Kageyama, Nicole P.; Hoang, Mai P.; Cockerell, Clay J.

In: Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 373-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

High, Whitney A. ; Stewart, David ; Essary, Lydia R. ; Kageyama, Nicole P. ; Hoang, Mai P. ; Cockerell, Clay J. / Sclerotic fibroma-like change in various neoplastic and inflammatory skin lesions : Is sclerotic fibroma a distinct entity?. In: Journal of Cutaneous Pathology. 2004 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 373-378.
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