Screening and Molecular Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells Using Micromagnet Array

Yu Yen Huang, Peng Chen, Chun Hsien Wu, Kazunori Hoshino, Konstantin Sokolov, Nancy Lane, Huaying Liu, Michael Huebschman, Eugene Frenkel, John X J Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunomagnetic assay has been developed to detect rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which shows clinical significance in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The generation and fine-tuning of the magnetic field play essential roles in such assay toward effective single-cell-based analyses of target cells. However, the current assay has a limited range of field gradient, potentially leading to aggregation of cells and nanoparticles. Consequently, quenching of the fluorescence signal and mechanical damage to the cells may occur, which lower the system sensitivity and specificity. We develop a micromagnet-integrated microfluidic system for enhanced CTC detection. The ferromagnetic micromagnets, after being magnetized, generate localized magnetic field up to 8-fold stronger than that without the micromagnets, and strengthen the interactions between CTCs and the magnetic field. The system is demonstrated with four cancer cell lines with over 97% capture rate, as well as with clinical samples from breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. The system captures target CTCs from patient blood samples on a standard glass slide that can be examined using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization method for the single-cell profiling. All cells showed clear hybridization signals, indicating the efficacy of the compact system in providing retrievable cells for molecular studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16047
JournalScientific Reports
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2015

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Circulating Neoplastic Cells
Magnetic Fields
Single-Cell Analysis
Cell Aggregation
Microfluidics
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Nanoparticles
Glass
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Fluorescence
Breast Neoplasms
Sensitivity and Specificity
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Huang, Y. Y., Chen, P., Wu, C. H., Hoshino, K., Sokolov, K., Lane, N., ... Zhang, J. X. J. (2015). Screening and Molecular Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells Using Micromagnet Array. Scientific Reports, 5, [16047]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep16047

Screening and Molecular Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells Using Micromagnet Array. / Huang, Yu Yen; Chen, Peng; Wu, Chun Hsien; Hoshino, Kazunori; Sokolov, Konstantin; Lane, Nancy; Liu, Huaying; Huebschman, Michael; Frenkel, Eugene; Zhang, John X J.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 5, 16047, 05.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, YY, Chen, P, Wu, CH, Hoshino, K, Sokolov, K, Lane, N, Liu, H, Huebschman, M, Frenkel, E & Zhang, JXJ 2015, 'Screening and Molecular Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells Using Micromagnet Array', Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 16047. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep16047
Huang, Yu Yen ; Chen, Peng ; Wu, Chun Hsien ; Hoshino, Kazunori ; Sokolov, Konstantin ; Lane, Nancy ; Liu, Huaying ; Huebschman, Michael ; Frenkel, Eugene ; Zhang, John X J. / Screening and Molecular Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells Using Micromagnet Array. In: Scientific Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
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