Secretory trail-armed natural killer cell-based therapy: In vitro and in vivo colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis xenograft

Xinxin Song, Se Hoon Hong, William T. Kwon, Lisa M. Bailey, Per Basse, David L. Bartlett, Yong Tae Kwon, Yong J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Since its discovery in 1995, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has sparked growing interest among oncologists due to its remarkable ability to induce apoptosis in malignant human cells, but not in most normal cells. However, one major drawback is its fast clearance rate in vivo. Thus, the development of an alternative means of delivery may increase the effectiveness of TRAIL-based therapy. In this study, we developed a secretory TRAIL-armed natural killer (NK) cell-based therapy and assessed its cytotoxic effects on colorectal cancer cells and its tumoricidal efficacy on colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis xenograft. We generated genetically modified NK cells by transduction with a lentiviral vector consisting of a secretion signal domain, a trimerization domain, and an extracellular domain of the TRAIL gene. These NK cells secreted a glycosylated form of TRAIL fusion protein that induced apoptotic death. Intraperitoneally, but not intravenously, injected NK cells effectively accumulated at tumor sites, infiltrated tumor tissue, induced apoptosis, and delayed tumor growth. These results shed light on the therapeutic potential of genetically engineered NK cells to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis. .

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1591-1601
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Cancer Therapeutics
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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