Selection bias: Examining the feasibility, utility, and participant receptivity to incorporating simulation into the general surgery residency selection process

Aimee K. Gardner, Christopher P. Steffes, Dmitry Nepomnayshy, Cate Nicholas, Warren D. Widmann, Shimae C. Fitzgibbons, Brian J. Dunkin, Daniel B. Jones, John T. Paige

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Opportunities exist to revise the current residency selection process to capture desirable candidate competencies. We examined the extent to which components of the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education simulation-based medical student curriculum combined with a teamwork activity could be used as potential screening method. Methods Students participated in a workshop consisting of training/evaluation of knot tying, suturing, airway management, gowning/gloving, and teamwork. Surveys were given to medical students (MS) and faculty/resident/staff (FRS) to examine their opinions about the residency screening process, the most critical competencies to assess, and the effectiveness of each station for candidate evaluation. Results Communication (FRS, 4.86 ±.35; MS, 4.93 ±.26), leadership (FRS, 4.41 ±.80; MS, 4.5 ±.76), judgment (FRS, 4.62 ±.74; MS, 4.67 ±.62), professionalism (FRS, 4.64 ±.73; MS, 5.00 ±.00), integrity (FRS, 4.71 ±.78; MS, 4.87 ±.35), and grit/resilience (FRS, 4.71 ±.78; MS, 4.53 ±.74) were considered most valuable for candidate screening. The simulation-based curriculum for evaluation of residency candidates was rated lowest by both groups. Open response comments indicated positive perceptions of this process. Conclusions Employing simulation to assess candidates may be most beneficial for examining nontechnical attributes. Future work should continue to explore this area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1171-1177
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume213
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Interview
  • Nontechnical skills
  • Residency
  • Selection
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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