Selection bias: Examining the feasibility, utility, and participant receptivity to incorporating simulation into the general surgery residency selection process

Aimee K. Gardner, Christopher P. Steffes, Dmitry Nepomnayshy, Cate Nicholas, Warren D. Widmann, Shimae C. Fitzgibbons, Brian J. Dunkin, Daniel B. Jones, John T. Paige

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Opportunities exist to revise the current residency selection process to capture desirable candidate competencies. We examined the extent to which components of the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education simulation-based medical student curriculum combined with a teamwork activity could be used as potential screening method. Methods: Students participated in a workshop consisting of training/evaluation of knot tying, suturing, airway management, gowning/gloving, and teamwork. Surveys were given to medical students (MS) and faculty/resident/staff (FRS) to examine their opinions about the residency screening process, the most critical competencies to assess, and the effectiveness of each station for candidate evaluation. Results: Communication (FRS, 4.86 ± .35; MS, 4.93 ± .26), leadership (FRS, 4.41 ± .80; MS, 4.5 ± .76), judgment (FRS, 4.62 ± .74; MS, 4.67 ± .62), professionalism (FRS, 4.64 ± .73; MS, 5.00 ± .00), integrity (FRS, 4.71 ± .78; MS, 4.87 ± .35), and grit/resilience (FRS, 4.71 ± .78; MS, 4.53 ± .74) were considered most valuable for candidate screening. The simulation-based curriculum for evaluation of residency candidates was rated lowest by both groups. Open response comments indicated positive perceptions of this process. Conclusions: Employing simulation to assess candidates may be most beneficial for examining nontechnical attributes. Future work should continue to explore this area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 9 2016

Fingerprint

Selection Bias
Internship and Residency
Medical Students
Curriculum
Education
Medical Faculties
Airway Management
Communication
Students

Keywords

  • Interview
  • Nontechnical skills
  • Residency
  • Selection
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Selection bias : Examining the feasibility, utility, and participant receptivity to incorporating simulation into the general surgery residency selection process. / Gardner, Aimee K.; Steffes, Christopher P.; Nepomnayshy, Dmitry; Nicholas, Cate; Widmann, Warren D.; Fitzgibbons, Shimae C.; Dunkin, Brian J.; Jones, Daniel B.; Paige, John T.

In: American Journal of Surgery, 09.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gardner, Aimee K. ; Steffes, Christopher P. ; Nepomnayshy, Dmitry ; Nicholas, Cate ; Widmann, Warren D. ; Fitzgibbons, Shimae C. ; Dunkin, Brian J. ; Jones, Daniel B. ; Paige, John T. / Selection bias : Examining the feasibility, utility, and participant receptivity to incorporating simulation into the general surgery residency selection process. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2016.
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