Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss

Andrea D. Warner-Czyz, Betty A. Loy, Christine Evans, Ashton Wetsel, Emily A. Tobey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, selfesteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t=2.38, p=.02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r=.42, p=.002) and attention (r=.45, p=.001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r=.60, p>.0001). No significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTrends in Hearing
PublisherTaylor and Francis Ltd.
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Hearing Loss
Self Concept
Communication
Temperament
Hearing Aids
Cochlear Implants
Hearing
Aptitude
Counseling
Referral and Consultation
Quality of Life
Demography
Equipment and Supplies
Population

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Cochlear implant
  • Hearing loss
  • Quality of life
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Warner-Czyz, A. D., Loy, B. A., Evans, C., Wetsel, A., & Tobey, E. A. (2015). Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss. In Trends in Hearing (Vol. 19). Taylor and Francis Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216515572615

Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss. / Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

Trends in Hearing. Vol. 19 Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Warner-Czyz, AD, Loy, BA, Evans, C, Wetsel, A & Tobey, EA 2015, Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss. in Trends in Hearing. vol. 19, Taylor and Francis Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216515572615
Warner-Czyz AD, Loy BA, Evans C, Wetsel A, Tobey EA. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss. In Trends in Hearing. Vol. 19. Taylor and Francis Ltd. 2015 https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216515572615
Warner-Czyz, Andrea D. ; Loy, Betty A. ; Evans, Christine ; Wetsel, Ashton ; Tobey, Emily A. / Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss. Trends in Hearing. Vol. 19 Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2015.
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