Self-organized cell motility from motor-filament interactions

Xinxin Du, Konstantin Doubrovinski, Miriam Osterfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell motility is driven primarily by the dynamics of the cell cytoskeleton, a system of filamentous proteins and molecular motors. It has been proposed that cell motility is a self-organized process, that is, local short-range interactions determine much of the dynamics that are required for the whole-cell organization that leads to polarization and directional motion. Here we present a mesoscopic mean-field description of filaments, motors, and cell boundaries. This description gives rise to a dynamical system that exhibits multiple self-organized states. We discuss several qualitative aspects of the asymptotic states and compare them with those of living cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1738-1745
Number of pages8
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume102
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2012

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Cell Movement
Molecular Motor Proteins
Cytoskeleton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

Self-organized cell motility from motor-filament interactions. / Du, Xinxin; Doubrovinski, Konstantin; Osterfield, Miriam.

In: Biophysical Journal, Vol. 102, No. 8, 18.04.2012, p. 1738-1745.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Du, Xinxin ; Doubrovinski, Konstantin ; Osterfield, Miriam. / Self-organized cell motility from motor-filament interactions. In: Biophysical Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 102, No. 8. pp. 1738-1745.
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