Self-rated health and risk of incident essential tremor: A prospective, population-based study (NEDICES)

Julián Benito-León, Elan D. Louis, Alberto Villarejo-Galende, Andrés Labiano-Fontcuberta, Félix Bermejo-Pareja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Essential tremor (ET), a highly-prevalent, progressive, aging-associated neurological disease, poses a significant public health challenge. Aside from its associated motor features, the disease affects cognition in some patients, mood, and morale, and has been associated with increased risk of mortality in the elderly. Studies have not investigated the relationship between self-rated health and risk of ET. We determined whether baseline poor self-rated health was associated with increased risk of incident ET. Methods: In this prospective, population-based study of people ≥65 years of age, subjects were evaluated at baseline and 3 years later. At baseline, subjects were asked to rate their health using a single-item health question. Hazard ratios (HR) of ET according to baseline self-rated health (very good, good, fair, poor, and very poor) were estimated with Cox models. Results: The 3853 subjects had a median follow-up duration of 3.2 years. There were 82 incident ET cases. Compared to subjects who rated their health as good or very good, the risk of ET was increased for subjects who rated their health as fair (HR = 1.69, p = 0.03), and for subjects who rated their health as poor or very poor (HR = 2.12, p = 0.02). In a fully adjusted model, the risk remained increased for subjects who rated their health as poor or very poor (HR = 2.34, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Subjects rating their health as poor/very poor at baseline were at increased risk of incident ET at follow-up. Premotor and/or early motor symptoms of ET could negatively influence self-perceptions of health status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clinical
  • Disease mechanisms
  • Epidemiology
  • Essential tremor
  • Population-based
  • Self-rated health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

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