Sensory aspects of movement disorders

Neepa Patel, Joseph Jankovic, Mark Hallett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-112
Number of pages13
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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