Separate and overlapping relationships of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Lauren C. Smith, Leanne Tamm, Carroll W. Hughes, Ira H. Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is debate regarding the dimensional versus categorical nature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study utilized confirmatory factor analysis to examine this issue. ADHD symptoms rated on interviews and rating scales from a large sample of individuals (ages 3-17, 74 % male, 75 % Caucasian) with ADHD were examined (n = 242). Four potential factor structures were tested to replicate prior findings in a sample with a wide age range and included only participants who met DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Correlations with executive function measures were performed to further assess the separability and validity of the derived factors. The data support a bifactor model with a general ADHD factor and two specific factors, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Importantly, the individual factors were also differentially correlated with executive functioning measures. This study adds to a growing literature suggesting both a general component to ADHD, as well as dimensional traits of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, associated with distinct executive functioning profiles. The presence of a general underlying factor contraindicates separating the inattentive and combined subtypes of ADHD into distinct disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-20
Number of pages12
JournalADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Impulsive Behavior
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Executive Function
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Statistical Factor Analysis
Interviews

Keywords

  • ADHD subtypes
  • Executive functioning
  • Factor analysis
  • Hyperactivity/impulsivity
  • Inattention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Separate and overlapping relationships of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. / Smith, Lauren C.; Tamm, Leanne; Hughes, Carroll W.; Bernstein, Ira H.

In: ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2013, p. 9-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3af281414d444bf5a799ecbfe415bbc6,
title = "Separate and overlapping relationships of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "There is debate regarding the dimensional versus categorical nature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study utilized confirmatory factor analysis to examine this issue. ADHD symptoms rated on interviews and rating scales from a large sample of individuals (ages 3-17, 74 {\%} male, 75 {\%} Caucasian) with ADHD were examined (n = 242). Four potential factor structures were tested to replicate prior findings in a sample with a wide age range and included only participants who met DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Correlations with executive function measures were performed to further assess the separability and validity of the derived factors. The data support a bifactor model with a general ADHD factor and two specific factors, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Importantly, the individual factors were also differentially correlated with executive functioning measures. This study adds to a growing literature suggesting both a general component to ADHD, as well as dimensional traits of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, associated with distinct executive functioning profiles. The presence of a general underlying factor contraindicates separating the inattentive and combined subtypes of ADHD into distinct disorders.",
keywords = "ADHD subtypes, Executive functioning, Factor analysis, Hyperactivity/impulsivity, Inattention",
author = "Smith, {Lauren C.} and Leanne Tamm and Hughes, {Carroll W.} and Bernstein, {Ira H.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s12402-012-0091-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "9--20",
journal = "ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders",
issn = "1866-6116",
publisher = "Springer Wien",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Separate and overlapping relationships of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

AU - Smith, Lauren C.

AU - Tamm, Leanne

AU - Hughes, Carroll W.

AU - Bernstein, Ira H.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - There is debate regarding the dimensional versus categorical nature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study utilized confirmatory factor analysis to examine this issue. ADHD symptoms rated on interviews and rating scales from a large sample of individuals (ages 3-17, 74 % male, 75 % Caucasian) with ADHD were examined (n = 242). Four potential factor structures were tested to replicate prior findings in a sample with a wide age range and included only participants who met DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Correlations with executive function measures were performed to further assess the separability and validity of the derived factors. The data support a bifactor model with a general ADHD factor and two specific factors, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Importantly, the individual factors were also differentially correlated with executive functioning measures. This study adds to a growing literature suggesting both a general component to ADHD, as well as dimensional traits of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, associated with distinct executive functioning profiles. The presence of a general underlying factor contraindicates separating the inattentive and combined subtypes of ADHD into distinct disorders.

AB - There is debate regarding the dimensional versus categorical nature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study utilized confirmatory factor analysis to examine this issue. ADHD symptoms rated on interviews and rating scales from a large sample of individuals (ages 3-17, 74 % male, 75 % Caucasian) with ADHD were examined (n = 242). Four potential factor structures were tested to replicate prior findings in a sample with a wide age range and included only participants who met DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Correlations with executive function measures were performed to further assess the separability and validity of the derived factors. The data support a bifactor model with a general ADHD factor and two specific factors, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Importantly, the individual factors were also differentially correlated with executive functioning measures. This study adds to a growing literature suggesting both a general component to ADHD, as well as dimensional traits of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, associated with distinct executive functioning profiles. The presence of a general underlying factor contraindicates separating the inattentive and combined subtypes of ADHD into distinct disorders.

KW - ADHD subtypes

KW - Executive functioning

KW - Factor analysis

KW - Hyperactivity/impulsivity

KW - Inattention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874548459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874548459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12402-012-0091-5

DO - 10.1007/s12402-012-0091-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 22996914

AN - SCOPUS:84874548459

VL - 5

SP - 9

EP - 20

JO - ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders

JF - ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders

SN - 1866-6116

IS - 1

ER -