Sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction involves altered mitochondrial-localization of tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2

Qun S. Zang, Bobbie Martinez, Xiao Yao, David L. Maass, Lisha Ma, Steven E. Wolf, Joseph P. Minei

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Abstract

Our previous research demonstrated that sepsis produces mitochondrial dysfunction with increased mitochondrial oxidative stress in the heart. The present study investigated the role of mitochondria-localized signaling molecules, tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, in sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction using a rat pneumonia-related sepsis model. SD rats were given an intratracheal injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4×106 CFU per rat, (or vehicle for shams); heart tissues were then harvested and subcellular fractions were prepared. By Western blot, we detected a gradual and significant decrease in Src and an increase in SHP2 in cardiac mitochondria within 24 hours post-inoculation. Furthermore, at 24 hours post-inoculation, sepsis caused a near 70% reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of all cardiac mitochondrial proteins. Decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of certain mitochondrial structural proteins (porin, cyclophilin D and cytochrome C) and functional proteins (complex II subunit 30kD and complex I subunit NDUFB8) were evident in the hearts of septic rats. In vitro, pre-treatment of mitochondrial fractions with recombinant active Src kinase elevated OXPHOS complex I and II-III activity, whereas the effect of SHP2 phosphatase was opposite. Neither Src nor SHP2 affected complex IV and V activity under the same conditions. By immunoprecipitation, we showed that Src and SHP2 consistently interacted with complex I and III in the heart, suggesting that complex I and III contain putative substrates of Src and SHP2. In addition, in vitro treatment of mitochondrial fractions with active Src suppressed sepsis-associated mtROS production and protected aconitase activity, an indirect marker of mitochondrial oxidative stress. On the contrary, active SHP2 phosphatase overproduced mtROS and deactivated aconitase under the same in vitro conditions. In conclusion, our data suggest that changes in mitochondria-localized signaling molecules Src and SHP2 constitute a potential signaling pathway to affect mitochondrial dysfunction in the heart during sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere43424
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2012

Fingerprint

Non-Receptor Type 11 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase
src-Family Kinases
tyrosine
Sepsis
phosphotransferases (kinases)
heart
Mitochondria
Rats
Aconitate Hydratase
aconitate hydratase
Phosphorylation
mitochondria
Oxidative stress
rats
Mitochondrial Proteins
Tyrosine
phosphorylation
oxidative stress
cyclophilins
Oxidative Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction involves altered mitochondrial-localization of tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. / Zang, Qun S.; Martinez, Bobbie; Yao, Xiao; Maass, David L.; Ma, Lisha; Wolf, Steven E.; Minei, Joseph P.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 8, e43424, 27.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Our previous research demonstrated that sepsis produces mitochondrial dysfunction with increased mitochondrial oxidative stress in the heart. The present study investigated the role of mitochondria-localized signaling molecules, tyrosine kinase Src and tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, in sepsis-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction using a rat pneumonia-related sepsis model. SD rats were given an intratracheal injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4×106 CFU per rat, (or vehicle for shams); heart tissues were then harvested and subcellular fractions were prepared. By Western blot, we detected a gradual and significant decrease in Src and an increase in SHP2 in cardiac mitochondria within 24 hours post-inoculation. Furthermore, at 24 hours post-inoculation, sepsis caused a near 70{\%} reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of all cardiac mitochondrial proteins. Decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of certain mitochondrial structural proteins (porin, cyclophilin D and cytochrome C) and functional proteins (complex II subunit 30kD and complex I subunit NDUFB8) were evident in the hearts of septic rats. In vitro, pre-treatment of mitochondrial fractions with recombinant active Src kinase elevated OXPHOS complex I and II-III activity, whereas the effect of SHP2 phosphatase was opposite. Neither Src nor SHP2 affected complex IV and V activity under the same conditions. By immunoprecipitation, we showed that Src and SHP2 consistently interacted with complex I and III in the heart, suggesting that complex I and III contain putative substrates of Src and SHP2. In addition, in vitro treatment of mitochondrial fractions with active Src suppressed sepsis-associated mtROS production and protected aconitase activity, an indirect marker of mitochondrial oxidative stress. On the contrary, active SHP2 phosphatase overproduced mtROS and deactivated aconitase under the same in vitro conditions. In conclusion, our data suggest that changes in mitochondria-localized signaling molecules Src and SHP2 constitute a potential signaling pathway to affect mitochondrial dysfunction in the heart during sepsis.",
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