Sepsis neonatorum

J. D. Siegel, G. H. McCracken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

243 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The term 'sepsis neonatorum' refers to bacterial infection of infants during the first month of life. The primary site of invasion is most often the bloodstream, with spread to the meninges in 25 to 30 per cent of cases. Systemic bacterial disease occurs in one to 10 cases per thousand live births, depending on such factors as the rate of prematurity, predisposing maternal conditions, and extent of life-support procedures required postnatally. The continued large case-fatality rates of 20 to more than 75 per cent and the substantial percentage of surviving infants who have neurologic handicaps have motivated investigators to define the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these infections in order to develop better modes of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. This review highlights the achievements of the past 10 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-647
Number of pages6
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume304
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1981

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Sepsis
Meninges
Live Birth
Bacterial Infections
Nervous System
Epidemiology
Mothers
Research Personnel
Mortality
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sepsis neonatorum. / Siegel, J. D.; McCracken, G. H.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 304, No. 11, 1981, p. 642-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siegel, JD & McCracken, GH 1981, 'Sepsis neonatorum', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 304, no. 11, pp. 642-647.
Siegel, J. D. ; McCracken, G. H. / Sepsis neonatorum. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1981 ; Vol. 304, No. 11. pp. 642-647.
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