Sex-specific differences in coronary artery disease risk factors, evaluation, and treatment: Have they been adequately evaluated?

Julie K. Fetters, Eric D. Peterson, Leslee J. Shaw, L. Kristin Newby, Robert M. Califf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Women constitute a significant, growing proportion of patients at risk for acute coronary events. Analyses of the pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis, and management of coronary disease in women have been hampered in that most clinical trials have studied predominantly male populations. For example, most diagnostic studies have not accounted for sex-specific differences in prevalence of disease or for confounding factors. Disease management in women has also been guided by outcomes data from mostly male populations. Although a review shows no sex-specific differences in relative risk reduction from treatment, it remains possible that differences exist, given the under-representation of women in trials. Including adequate numbers of women in future trials is important yet costly, because of the larger total sample sizes required. Nevertheless, continued inquiry is required to answer the questions raised by current investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-813
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume131
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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