Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females.

J. B. Keith, C. McCreary, K. Collins, C. P. Smith, I. Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A modified form of Nathanson and Becker's (1983) Health Belief Model Questionnaire and other measures designed to assess cognitive processing were administered to low-income black adolescent female clients of an inner-city comprehensive health care clinic. The purpose of the study was to explore determinants of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Subjects were classified as not sexually active (n = 50), sexually active/noncontracepting (n = 20), or sexually active/contracepting (n = 72). Not sexually active subjects tended to be younger, more career motivated, to have a father at home, to be more influenced by family values, and to have more conservative attitudes regarding adolescent sexuality than did sexually active subjects. Sexually active/noncontracepting subjects tended to report fewer benefits and more barriers to the use of contraception. Level of cognitive processing did not differ among the three groups, but was at a lower-than-expected level for age. Finally, inconsistent contraceptive use was common to both sexually active groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-785
Number of pages17
JournalAdolescence
Volume26
Issue number104
StatePublished - Dec 1991

Fingerprint

female adolescent
Contraceptive Agents
contraceptive
Sexual Behavior
low income
Comprehensive Health Care
Sexuality
Contraception
Fathers
adolescent sexuality
Health
contraception
father
Group
career
health care
determinants
questionnaire
health
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Keith, J. B., McCreary, C., Collins, K., Smith, C. P., & Bernstein, I. (1991). Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females. Adolescence, 26(104), 769-785.

Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females. / Keith, J. B.; McCreary, C.; Collins, K.; Smith, C. P.; Bernstein, I.

In: Adolescence, Vol. 26, No. 104, 12.1991, p. 769-785.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keith, JB, McCreary, C, Collins, K, Smith, CP & Bernstein, I 1991, 'Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females.', Adolescence, vol. 26, no. 104, pp. 769-785.
Keith JB, McCreary C, Collins K, Smith CP, Bernstein I. Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females. Adolescence. 1991 Dec;26(104):769-785.
Keith, J. B. ; McCreary, C. ; Collins, K. ; Smith, C. P. ; Bernstein, I. / Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females. In: Adolescence. 1991 ; Vol. 26, No. 104. pp. 769-785.
@article{c1ce93f77c0f420287628f852dd91672,
title = "Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females.",
abstract = "A modified form of Nathanson and Becker's (1983) Health Belief Model Questionnaire and other measures designed to assess cognitive processing were administered to low-income black adolescent female clients of an inner-city comprehensive health care clinic. The purpose of the study was to explore determinants of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Subjects were classified as not sexually active (n = 50), sexually active/noncontracepting (n = 20), or sexually active/contracepting (n = 72). Not sexually active subjects tended to be younger, more career motivated, to have a father at home, to be more influenced by family values, and to have more conservative attitudes regarding adolescent sexuality than did sexually active subjects. Sexually active/noncontracepting subjects tended to report fewer benefits and more barriers to the use of contraception. Level of cognitive processing did not differ among the three groups, but was at a lower-than-expected level for age. Finally, inconsistent contraceptive use was common to both sexually active groups.",
author = "Keith, {J. B.} and C. McCreary and K. Collins and Smith, {C. P.} and I. Bernstein",
year = "1991",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "769--785",
journal = "Adolescence",
issn = "0001-8449",
publisher = "Libra Publishers Inc.",
number = "104",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sexual activity and contraceptive use among low-income urban black adolescent females.

AU - Keith, J. B.

AU - McCreary, C.

AU - Collins, K.

AU - Smith, C. P.

AU - Bernstein, I.

PY - 1991/12

Y1 - 1991/12

N2 - A modified form of Nathanson and Becker's (1983) Health Belief Model Questionnaire and other measures designed to assess cognitive processing were administered to low-income black adolescent female clients of an inner-city comprehensive health care clinic. The purpose of the study was to explore determinants of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Subjects were classified as not sexually active (n = 50), sexually active/noncontracepting (n = 20), or sexually active/contracepting (n = 72). Not sexually active subjects tended to be younger, more career motivated, to have a father at home, to be more influenced by family values, and to have more conservative attitudes regarding adolescent sexuality than did sexually active subjects. Sexually active/noncontracepting subjects tended to report fewer benefits and more barriers to the use of contraception. Level of cognitive processing did not differ among the three groups, but was at a lower-than-expected level for age. Finally, inconsistent contraceptive use was common to both sexually active groups.

AB - A modified form of Nathanson and Becker's (1983) Health Belief Model Questionnaire and other measures designed to assess cognitive processing were administered to low-income black adolescent female clients of an inner-city comprehensive health care clinic. The purpose of the study was to explore determinants of sexual activity and contraceptive use. Subjects were classified as not sexually active (n = 50), sexually active/noncontracepting (n = 20), or sexually active/contracepting (n = 72). Not sexually active subjects tended to be younger, more career motivated, to have a father at home, to be more influenced by family values, and to have more conservative attitudes regarding adolescent sexuality than did sexually active subjects. Sexually active/noncontracepting subjects tended to report fewer benefits and more barriers to the use of contraception. Level of cognitive processing did not differ among the three groups, but was at a lower-than-expected level for age. Finally, inconsistent contraceptive use was common to both sexually active groups.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026300171&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026300171&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 769

EP - 785

JO - Adolescence

JF - Adolescence

SN - 0001-8449

IS - 104

ER -