Short-Term Costs and Hospitalization Rates in Patients With Adult Congenital Heart Disease After Pulmonic Valve Replacement

Deana Mikhalkova, Eric Novak, Ari Cedars

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population, pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) is a common intervention, its benefit, however, has been incompletely investigated. This study investigates short- and intermediate-term outcomes after PVR in ACHD. Using State Inpatient Databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we investigated both hospitalization rate and financial burden accrued over the 12-month period after PVR compared with the 12 months before. Among 202 patients who underwent PVR, per patient-year hospitalization rates doubled in the year after PVR compared with the year before (0.16 vs 0.36, p = 0.006). With the exception of postprocedural complications, the most common reasons for hospitalization were unchanged after surgery: 22% of patients were admitted with equal or greater frequency after PVR. These patients experienced higher inpatient costs both at index admission and in the year after PVR (p = 0.004 and p <0.001, respectively). Univariate predictors of increased hospitalizations after PVR were age ≥50 years (p = 0.016), transposition of the great arteries, or conotruncal abnormalities (p <0.001), lipid disorders (p = 0.025), hypertension (p = 0.033), and number of chronic conditions ≥4 (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis identified transposition of the great arteries or conotruncal abnormalities as an independent risk factor for increased hospitalization and cost post-PVR (p ≤0.001). In conclusion, short-term costs and hospitalization rates increase after PVR in a small group of patients with ACHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1552-1557
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume118
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Valve
Heart Diseases
Hospitalization
Costs and Cost Analysis
Lung
Transposition of Great Vessels
Inpatients
Health Care Costs
Multivariate Analysis
Databases
Hypertension
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Short-Term Costs and Hospitalization Rates in Patients With Adult Congenital Heart Disease After Pulmonic Valve Replacement. / Mikhalkova, Deana; Novak, Eric; Cedars, Ari.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 118, No. 10, 15.11.2016, p. 1552-1557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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