Short-term kidney transplant outcomes from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 lower respiratory tract positive donors

Jorge A. Sanchez-Vivaldi, Madhukar S Patel, Jigesh A Shah, Benjamin K. Wang, Juan D. Salcedo-Betancourt, Christine S Hwang, David Wojciechowski, Ricardo M. La Hoz, Parsia A. Vagefi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: In this study, we aim to assess short-term allograft outcomes following deceased donor kidney transplantation from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) lower respiratory tract (LRT) nucleic acid testing (NAT) positive donors. Methods: From September to December 2021, SARS-CoV-2 NAT positive organ donors, whose solid abdominal organs were transplanted at our academic medical center were identified. Donors were stratified into having tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in an upper respiratory tract (URT) or LRT sample. For this study, the SARS-CoV-2 LRT NAT positive deceased kidney donors and their respective recipients were examined. Donor and recipient demographic data, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related history, patient outcomes, as well as postoperative graft function were evaluated. Results: Thirteen SARS-CoV-2 positive deceased donors were identified. Of these, eight were LRT NAT positive and yielded nine kidneys. These allografts were successfully transplanted into vaccinated and unvaccinated recipients. All recipients received standard induction immunosuppression and did not receive any prophylactic therapy for SARS-CoV-2. Two recipients had delayed graft function. At 1-month post-transplant, there was no clinical evidence of donor-derived COVID-19 or graft loss, and all recipients were free from dialysis. Conclusion: We describe the first case series of SARS-CoV-2 LRT NAT positive deceased kidney donors for vaccinated and unvaccinated recipients with excellent short-term allograft outcomes and no clinical evidence of donor-derived COVID-19 post-transplantation. Given the increasing prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in the population, utilization of SARS-CoV-2 LRT NAT positive deceased donors could be considered an acceptable source of organs for renal transplantation, especially as multi-center experiences and longer-term follow-up emerge. (Figure presented.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19 deceased donors
  • lower respiratory tract positive donors
  • renal transplant
  • SARS-CoV-2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Infectious Diseases

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