Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung

Colin D R Borland, Helen Dunningham, Fiona Bottrill, Alain Vuylsteke, Cuneyt Yilmaz, D. Merril Dane, Connie C W Hsia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) is used to measure alveolar membrane conductance (DMNO), but disagreement remains as to whether DMNO= DLNO, and whether blood conductance (θNO) = ∞. Our previous in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that θNO < ∞. We now show in a membrane oxygenator model perfused with whole blood that addition of a cell-free bovine hemoglobin (Hb) glutamer-200 solution increased diffusing capacity of the circuit (D) for NO (DNO) by 39%, D for carbon monoxide (Dco) by 24%, and the ratio of DLNO to Dco by 12% (all P < 0.001). In three anesthetized dogs, DLNO and DLCO were measured by a rebreathing technique before and after three successive equal volume-exchange transfusions with bovine Hb glutamer-200 (10 ml/kg each, total exchange 30 ml/kg). At baseline, DLNO/DLCO= 4.5. After exchange transfusion, DLNO rose 57 ± 16% (mean ± SD, P = 0.02) and DLNO/DLCO = 7.1, whereas DLCO remained unchanged. Thus, in vitro and in vivo data directly demonstrate a finite θNO. We conclude that the erythrocyte and/or its immediate environment imposes considerable resistance to alveolar-capillary NO uptake. DLNO is sensitive to dynamic hematological factors and is not a pure index of conductance of the alveolar tissue membrane. With successive exchange transfusion, the estimated in vivo θNO [5.1 ml NO·(ml blood·min·Torr)-1] approached 4.5 ml NO·(ml blood·min·Torr)-1, which was derived from in vitro measurements by Carlsen and Comroe (J Gen Physiol 42: 83-107, 1958). Therefore, we suggest use of θNo = 4.5 ml NO·(min· Torr·ml blood)-1 for calculation of DMNO and pulmonary capillary blood volume from DLNO and DLCO

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1052-1060
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume108
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Nitric Oxide
Lung
Membrane Oxygenators
Lung Volume Measurements
Membranes
Carbon Monoxide
Blood Volume
Erythrocytes
Dogs
In Vitro Techniques
hemoglobin glutamer-200

Keywords

  • Blood substitute
  • Bovine hemoglobin glutamer
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Exchange transfusion
  • Gas exchange
  • Lung diffusing capacity
  • Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide
  • Lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide
  • Membrane diffusing capacity
  • Membrane oxygenator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Borland, C. D. R., Dunningham, H., Bottrill, F., Vuylsteke, A., Yilmaz, C., Dane, D. M., & Hsia, C. C. W. (2010). Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung. Journal of Applied Physiology, 108(5), 1052-1060. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00904.2009

Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung. / Borland, Colin D R; Dunningham, Helen; Bottrill, Fiona; Vuylsteke, Alain; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, D. Merril; Hsia, Connie C W.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 108, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 1052-1060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borland, CDR, Dunningham, H, Bottrill, F, Vuylsteke, A, Yilmaz, C, Dane, DM & Hsia, CCW 2010, 'Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 108, no. 5, pp. 1052-1060. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00904.2009
Borland CDR, Dunningham H, Bottrill F, Vuylsteke A, Yilmaz C, Dane DM et al. Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2010 May;108(5):1052-1060. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00904.2009
Borland, Colin D R ; Dunningham, Helen ; Bottrill, Fiona ; Vuylsteke, Alain ; Yilmaz, Cuneyt ; Dane, D. Merril ; Hsia, Connie C W. / Significant blood resistance to nitric oxide transfer in the lung. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2010 ; Vol. 108, No. 5. pp. 1052-1060.
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