Single institutional experience of interrupted aortic arch repair over 28 years

Takeshi Shinkawa, Robert D B Jaquiss, Michiaki Imamura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

A single institutional outcome of the biventricular repair for congenital heart disease with interrupted aortic arch between 1982 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 48 consecutive patients with a mean follow-up of 10.0 ± 7.9 years. The staged repair was applied in 27 patients, and primary complete repair was applied in 21. The actuarial survival was 79.0% at 10 years. There was a significant difference in survival between the patients operated before 2000 and after 2001 (65.2 vs. 100% at 10 years, P = 0.005), but not in survival between the staged repair and the primary complete repair (77.4 vs. 81.0% at 10 years, P = 0.793). There was no significant difference in freedom from unplanned reoperation between the staged repair and the primary complete repair (47.9 vs. 70.6% at 5 years, P = 0.249). No patients with primary complete repair had reoperation for left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, whereas five patients with staged repair did. The patients with interposition graft placement between ascending and descending aorta had significantly low freedom from reoperation for the aortic arch compared with other techniques (7.2 vs. 90.0% at 10 years, P = 0.001). In conclusion, surgical outcomes for interrupted aortic arch have been significantly improved in the last decade and the staged repair remains an effective option in selected patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-555
Number of pages5
JournalInteractive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Keywords

  • Aortic arch
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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