Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movement Dysfunction and Liability for Schizophrenia: Implications for Genetic Modeling

Brett A. Clementz, William M. Grove, William G. Iacono, John A. Sweeney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

Forty-one nonpsychiatric subjects, 38 probands with schizophrenia, and 99 of their relatives were studied. Oculomotor functioning was bimodally distributed for probands and relatives. Oculomotor dysfunction was not present in all families with a schizophrenic proband. In those families in which it was present, there were significant phenotypic correlations between oculomotor functioning and schizophrenia-related characteristics. The patterns of familial resemblance in the families in whom oculomotor dysfunction was present were consistent with nonadditive genetic variance contributing both to oculomotor dysfunction and to the relationship between oculomotor dysfunction and clinical symptoms. These results suggest that schizophrenia may be etiologically heterogenous and that oculomotor dysfunction may help to identify nonadditive genetic variance for this disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-129
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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