Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children

Sabina B. Gesell, Erica B. Reynolds, Edward H. Ip, Lindy C. Fenlason, Stephen J. Pont, Eli K. Poe, Shari L. Barkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychosocial variables influence physical activity for different age groups, sex, and ethnic groups. However, little is known about their influence on physical activity in preadolescent Latino children. The authors examined how a) confidence in one's ability to be physically active (self-efficacy); b) ideas about the consequences of being physically active (beliefs), and c) the influences of family and friends on physical activity (social influences) effect physical activity levels in overweight (body mass index <85%) Latino preadolescent children. One hundred and fourteen preadolescents participated in a larger intervention designed to improve healthy lifestyles for Latino families. The authors report baseline data collected at a community-based primary care clinic. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only social influences significantly predicted (P <.01) the metabolic equivalent adjusted self-reported baseline physical activity. Prevention and intervention strategies that augment social influences on physical activity are likely to result in more physical activity and improved health in these children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-802
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume47
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Exercise
Metabolic Equivalent
Aptitude
Self Efficacy
Ethnic Groups
Primary Health Care
Body Mass Index
Multivariate Analysis
Age Groups
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Obesity
  • Social influences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Gesell, S. B., Reynolds, E. B., Ip, E. H., Fenlason, L. C., Pont, S. J., Poe, E. K., & Barkin, S. L. (2008). Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children. Clinical Pediatrics, 47(8), 797-802. https://doi.org/10.1177/0009922808318340

Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children. / Gesell, Sabina B.; Reynolds, Erica B.; Ip, Edward H.; Fenlason, Lindy C.; Pont, Stephen J.; Poe, Eli K.; Barkin, Shari L.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 47, No. 8, 10.2008, p. 797-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gesell, SB, Reynolds, EB, Ip, EH, Fenlason, LC, Pont, SJ, Poe, EK & Barkin, SL 2008, 'Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 47, no. 8, pp. 797-802. https://doi.org/10.1177/0009922808318340
Gesell SB, Reynolds EB, Ip EH, Fenlason LC, Pont SJ, Poe EK et al. Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children. Clinical Pediatrics. 2008 Oct;47(8):797-802. https://doi.org/10.1177/0009922808318340
Gesell, Sabina B. ; Reynolds, Erica B. ; Ip, Edward H. ; Fenlason, Lindy C. ; Pont, Stephen J. ; Poe, Eli K. ; Barkin, Shari L. / Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2008 ; Vol. 47, No. 8. pp. 797-802.
@article{bfc0c40c3cda4199893da6bce42c92e1,
title = "Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children",
abstract = "Psychosocial variables influence physical activity for different age groups, sex, and ethnic groups. However, little is known about their influence on physical activity in preadolescent Latino children. The authors examined how a) confidence in one's ability to be physically active (self-efficacy); b) ideas about the consequences of being physically active (beliefs), and c) the influences of family and friends on physical activity (social influences) effect physical activity levels in overweight (body mass index <85{\%}) Latino preadolescent children. One hundred and fourteen preadolescents participated in a larger intervention designed to improve healthy lifestyles for Latino families. The authors report baseline data collected at a community-based primary care clinic. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only social influences significantly predicted (P <.01) the metabolic equivalent adjusted self-reported baseline physical activity. Prevention and intervention strategies that augment social influences on physical activity are likely to result in more physical activity and improved health in these children.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Social influences",
author = "Gesell, {Sabina B.} and Reynolds, {Erica B.} and Ip, {Edward H.} and Fenlason, {Lindy C.} and Pont, {Stephen J.} and Poe, {Eli K.} and Barkin, {Shari L.}",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1177/0009922808318340",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "797--802",
journal = "Clinical Pediatrics",
issn = "0009-9228",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social influences on self-reported physical activity in overweight Latino children

AU - Gesell, Sabina B.

AU - Reynolds, Erica B.

AU - Ip, Edward H.

AU - Fenlason, Lindy C.

AU - Pont, Stephen J.

AU - Poe, Eli K.

AU - Barkin, Shari L.

PY - 2008/10

Y1 - 2008/10

N2 - Psychosocial variables influence physical activity for different age groups, sex, and ethnic groups. However, little is known about their influence on physical activity in preadolescent Latino children. The authors examined how a) confidence in one's ability to be physically active (self-efficacy); b) ideas about the consequences of being physically active (beliefs), and c) the influences of family and friends on physical activity (social influences) effect physical activity levels in overweight (body mass index <85%) Latino preadolescent children. One hundred and fourteen preadolescents participated in a larger intervention designed to improve healthy lifestyles for Latino families. The authors report baseline data collected at a community-based primary care clinic. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only social influences significantly predicted (P <.01) the metabolic equivalent adjusted self-reported baseline physical activity. Prevention and intervention strategies that augment social influences on physical activity are likely to result in more physical activity and improved health in these children.

AB - Psychosocial variables influence physical activity for different age groups, sex, and ethnic groups. However, little is known about their influence on physical activity in preadolescent Latino children. The authors examined how a) confidence in one's ability to be physically active (self-efficacy); b) ideas about the consequences of being physically active (beliefs), and c) the influences of family and friends on physical activity (social influences) effect physical activity levels in overweight (body mass index <85%) Latino preadolescent children. One hundred and fourteen preadolescents participated in a larger intervention designed to improve healthy lifestyles for Latino families. The authors report baseline data collected at a community-based primary care clinic. Multivariate regression analyses showed that only social influences significantly predicted (P <.01) the metabolic equivalent adjusted self-reported baseline physical activity. Prevention and intervention strategies that augment social influences on physical activity are likely to result in more physical activity and improved health in these children.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Hispanic Americans

KW - Obesity

KW - Social influences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50949118438&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50949118438&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0009922808318340

DO - 10.1177/0009922808318340

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 797

EP - 802

JO - Clinical Pediatrics

JF - Clinical Pediatrics

SN - 0009-9228

IS - 8

ER -