Sociodemographic and hispanic acculturation factors and isolated anotia/microtia

National Birth Defects Prevention Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It has been observed in several studies that infants with anotia/microtia are more common among Hispanics compared with other racial/ethnic groups. We examined the association between selected Hispanic ethnicity and acculturation factors and anotia/microtia in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods: We examined data from mothers of 351 infants with isolated anotia/microtia and 8435 unaffected infants from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study with an expected delivery date from 1997 to 2007. Sociodemographic, maternal, and acculturation factors (e.g., age, maternal education, household income, body mass index, gestational diabetes, folic acid, smoking, alcohol intake, study center, parental birthplace, and years lived in the United States, maternal language) were assessed as overall risk factors and also as risk factors among subgroups of Hispanics (United States- and foreign-born) versus non-Hispanic whites. Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, both United States- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers demonstrated substantially higher odds of delivering infants with anotia/microtia across nearly all strata of sociodemographic and other maternal factors (adjusted odds ratios range: 2.1-11.9). The odds of anotia/microtia was particularly elevated among Hispanic mothers who emigrated from Mexico after age five (adjusted odds ratios=4.88; 95% confidence interval=2.93-8.11) or who conducted the interview in Spanish (adjusted odds ratios=4.97; 95% confidence interval=3.00-8.24). Conclusion: We observed that certain sociodemographic and acculturation factors are associated with higher risks of anotia/microtia among offspring of Hispanic mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)852-862
Number of pages11
JournalBirth Defects Research Part A - Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Volume100
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Gestational Diabetes
Age Factors
Maternal Age
Mexico
Microtia-Anotia
Folic Acid
Ethnic Groups
Body Mass Index
Language
Smoking
Alcohols
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Anotia
  • Hispanic
  • Microtia
  • Nativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Embryology

Cite this

Sociodemographic and hispanic acculturation factors and isolated anotia/microtia. / National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

In: Birth Defects Research Part A - Clinical and Molecular Teratology, Vol. 100, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 852-862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: It has been observed in several studies that infants with anotia/microtia are more common among Hispanics compared with other racial/ethnic groups. We examined the association between selected Hispanic ethnicity and acculturation factors and anotia/microtia in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods: We examined data from mothers of 351 infants with isolated anotia/microtia and 8435 unaffected infants from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study with an expected delivery date from 1997 to 2007. Sociodemographic, maternal, and acculturation factors (e.g., age, maternal education, household income, body mass index, gestational diabetes, folic acid, smoking, alcohol intake, study center, parental birthplace, and years lived in the United States, maternal language) were assessed as overall risk factors and also as risk factors among subgroups of Hispanics (United States- and foreign-born) versus non-Hispanic whites. Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, both United States- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers demonstrated substantially higher odds of delivering infants with anotia/microtia across nearly all strata of sociodemographic and other maternal factors (adjusted odds ratios range: 2.1-11.9). The odds of anotia/microtia was particularly elevated among Hispanic mothers who emigrated from Mexico after age five (adjusted odds ratios=4.88; 95{\%} confidence interval=2.93-8.11) or who conducted the interview in Spanish (adjusted odds ratios=4.97; 95{\%} confidence interval=3.00-8.24). Conclusion: We observed that certain sociodemographic and acculturation factors are associated with higher risks of anotia/microtia among offspring of Hispanic mothers.",
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author = "{National Birth Defects Prevention Study} and Hoyt, {Adrienne T.} and Canfield, {Mark A.} and Shaw, {Gary M.} and Waller, {Dorothy K.} and Polen, {Kara N D} and Tunu Ramadhani and Anderka, {Marlene T.} and Scheuerle, {Angela E.}",
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AU - National Birth Defects Prevention Study

AU - Hoyt, Adrienne T.

AU - Canfield, Mark A.

AU - Shaw, Gary M.

AU - Waller, Dorothy K.

AU - Polen, Kara N D

AU - Ramadhani, Tunu

AU - Anderka, Marlene T.

AU - Scheuerle, Angela E.

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AB - Background: It has been observed in several studies that infants with anotia/microtia are more common among Hispanics compared with other racial/ethnic groups. We examined the association between selected Hispanic ethnicity and acculturation factors and anotia/microtia in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods: We examined data from mothers of 351 infants with isolated anotia/microtia and 8435 unaffected infants from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study with an expected delivery date from 1997 to 2007. Sociodemographic, maternal, and acculturation factors (e.g., age, maternal education, household income, body mass index, gestational diabetes, folic acid, smoking, alcohol intake, study center, parental birthplace, and years lived in the United States, maternal language) were assessed as overall risk factors and also as risk factors among subgroups of Hispanics (United States- and foreign-born) versus non-Hispanic whites. Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, both United States- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers demonstrated substantially higher odds of delivering infants with anotia/microtia across nearly all strata of sociodemographic and other maternal factors (adjusted odds ratios range: 2.1-11.9). The odds of anotia/microtia was particularly elevated among Hispanic mothers who emigrated from Mexico after age five (adjusted odds ratios=4.88; 95% confidence interval=2.93-8.11) or who conducted the interview in Spanish (adjusted odds ratios=4.97; 95% confidence interval=3.00-8.24). Conclusion: We observed that certain sociodemographic and acculturation factors are associated with higher risks of anotia/microtia among offspring of Hispanic mothers.

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