Spatiotemporal patterning during T cell activation is highly diverse

Kentner L. Singleton, Kole T. Roybal, Yi Sun, Guo Fu, Nicholas R J Gascoigne, Nicolai S C Van Oers, Christoph Wülfing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temporal and spatial variations in the concentrations of signaling intermediates in a living cell are important for signaling in complex networks because they modulate the probabilities that signaling intermediates will interact with each other. We have studied 30 signaling sensors, ranging from receptors to transcription factors, in the physiological activation ofmurine ex vivo T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Spatiotemporal patterning of thesemolecules was highly diverse and varied with specific T cell receptors and T cell activation conditions. The diversity and variability observed suggest that spatiotemporal patterning controls signaling interactions during T cell activation in a physiologically important and discriminating manner. In support of this, the effective clustering of a group of ligand-engaged receptors and signaling intermediates in a joint pattern consistently correlated with efficient T cell activation at the level of the whole cell.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalScience Signaling
Volume2
Issue number65
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2009

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T-cells
Chemical activation
T-Lymphocytes
Viral Tumor Antigens
Antigen-Presenting Cells
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Cluster Analysis
Transcription Factors
Joints
Complex networks
Ligands
Cells
Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Singleton, K. L., Roybal, K. T., Sun, Y., Fu, G., Gascoigne, N. R. J., Van Oers, N. S. C., & Wülfing, C. (2009). Spatiotemporal patterning during T cell activation is highly diverse. Science Signaling, 2(65). https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2000199

Spatiotemporal patterning during T cell activation is highly diverse. / Singleton, Kentner L.; Roybal, Kole T.; Sun, Yi; Fu, Guo; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Van Oers, Nicolai S C; Wülfing, Christoph.

In: Science Signaling, Vol. 2, No. 65, 07.04.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singleton, KL, Roybal, KT, Sun, Y, Fu, G, Gascoigne, NRJ, Van Oers, NSC & Wülfing, C 2009, 'Spatiotemporal patterning during T cell activation is highly diverse', Science Signaling, vol. 2, no. 65. https://doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2000199
Singleton, Kentner L. ; Roybal, Kole T. ; Sun, Yi ; Fu, Guo ; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J ; Van Oers, Nicolai S C ; Wülfing, Christoph. / Spatiotemporal patterning during T cell activation is highly diverse. In: Science Signaling. 2009 ; Vol. 2, No. 65.
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