Splanchnic vasoconstriction and bacterial translocation after thermal injury

W. G. Jones, J. P. Minei, A. E. Barber, T. J. Fahey, G. T. Shires, G. T. Shires

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gut barrier failure and bacterial translocation (BT) after thermal injury may result from splanchnic vasoconstriction and intestinal ischemia. The role of the renin-angiotensin system in intestinal blood flow and BT after thermal injury was studied by pretreatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril in Wistar rats before sham or 30% scald burn. Adequacy of ACE inhibition was documented by the absence of a hypertensive response to angiotensin I, and intestinal blood flow was determined using 51Cr-labeled microspheres. Small bowel blood flow was decreased by 46% at 4-h postburn (P < 0.05) in untreated burned animals despite maintenance of normal cardiac index but returned to baseline levels by 24 h after injury. Enalapril pretreatment resulted in maintenance of small bowel blood flow after thermal injury and was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of BT (20% vs. 75% in untreated burned animals, P < 0.01). These findings further implicate intestinal ischemia in the etiology of gut barrier dysfunction after thermal injury, mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume261
Issue number4 30-4
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Bacterial Translocation
Viscera
Vasoconstriction
Hot Temperature
Wounds and Injuries
Enalapril
Renin-Angiotensin System
Ischemia
Maintenance
Angiotensin I
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Microspheres
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Wistar Rats
Incidence

Keywords

  • angiotensin
  • burn injury
  • enalapril
  • gut barrier
  • renin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Splanchnic vasoconstriction and bacterial translocation after thermal injury. / Jones, W. G.; Minei, J. P.; Barber, A. E.; Fahey, T. J.; Shires, G. T.; Shires, G. T.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 261, No. 4 30-4, 1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, W. G. ; Minei, J. P. ; Barber, A. E. ; Fahey, T. J. ; Shires, G. T. ; Shires, G. T. / Splanchnic vasoconstriction and bacterial translocation after thermal injury. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 1991 ; Vol. 261, No. 4 30-4.
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