Standardized descriptive method for the anthropological evaluation of pediatric skull fractures

Jason M. Wiersema, Jennifer C. Love, Sharon M. Derrick, Deborrah C. Pinto, Marcella Donaruma-Kwoh, Christopher S. Greeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The literature pertaining to pediatric skull fracture is primarily clinically based and thus motivated by the need for effective assessment of both fracture characteristics (type, frequency, location, and mechanics) and context (severity of injury, associated soft tissue damage, and prognosis). From a strictly descriptive standpoint, these schemas employ overlapping levels of detail that confound the nonclinical description of fractures in the forensic context. For this reason, application of these schemas in the forensic anthropological interpretation of skull fractures is inappropriate. We argue that forensic anthropological interpretation of skull fractures requires a standard classification system that reflects fracture morphology alone, and we suggest a three-stepped classification system that conveys increasing detail with each additional step. A retrospective application of the method to a sample of 31 children aged 1 month to 2 years demonstrated its efficacy in the description of pediatric skull fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1487-1492
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Forensic Sciences
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bone injury
  • Cranial fractures
  • Forensic anthropology
  • Forensic science
  • Pediatric trauma
  • Skull fractures
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Genetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Standardized descriptive method for the anthropological evaluation of pediatric skull fractures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this