Statins for primary prevention in physically active individuals

Do the risks outweigh the benefits?

Ishak A. Mansi, Jenny L. English, Michael J. Morris, Song Zhang, Eric M. Mortensen, Ethan A. Halm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: There are little data on the potential benefits and adverse events of statins among physically fit individuals. Our objective was to examine the associations of statin use with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes and adverse events in active duty military (a surrogate for high level of physical fitness). Design: This is a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study of healthy active duty military (fiscal years [FY] 2002-2011). Methods: Statin-users received statins during FY 2005 as their only prescription medication. FY 2002-2004 was used to describe baseline characteristics; and FY 2006-2011were used to capture outcomes. Study outcomes included major acute cardiovascular events (MACE), diabetes mellitus and its complications, kidney diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, obesity, and malignancy. Results: We propensity score matched 837 statin-users to 2488 nonusers. During follow-up, 1.6% statin-users and 1.5% nonusers were diagnosed with MACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.98), 12.5% of statin-users and 5.8% of nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.79-3.04), and 1.7% statin- users and 0.7% nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes with complication (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.21-5.04). There were no differences in rates of other adverse events. Conclusions: Among healthy physically active individuals, statin use was associated with doubled the odds of diabetes and diabetic complications without countervailing cardiovascular benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 21 2016

Fingerprint

Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Primary Prevention
Diabetes Complications
Propensity Score
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Physical Fitness
Kidney Diseases
Prescriptions
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Diabetic complications
  • Physical activity
  • Primary prevention
  • Statin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

@article{b107c93621084d329aa674098c6cbf49,
title = "Statins for primary prevention in physically active individuals: Do the risks outweigh the benefits?",
abstract = "Objectives: There are little data on the potential benefits and adverse events of statins among physically fit individuals. Our objective was to examine the associations of statin use with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes and adverse events in active duty military (a surrogate for high level of physical fitness). Design: This is a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study of healthy active duty military (fiscal years [FY] 2002-2011). Methods: Statin-users received statins during FY 2005 as their only prescription medication. FY 2002-2004 was used to describe baseline characteristics; and FY 2006-2011were used to capture outcomes. Study outcomes included major acute cardiovascular events (MACE), diabetes mellitus and its complications, kidney diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, obesity, and malignancy. Results: We propensity score matched 837 statin-users to 2488 nonusers. During follow-up, 1.6{\%} statin-users and 1.5{\%} nonusers were diagnosed with MACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.98), 12.5{\%} of statin-users and 5.8{\%} of nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes (OR 2.34, 95{\%} CI 1.79-3.04), and 1.7{\%} statin- users and 0.7{\%} nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes with complication (OR 2.47, 95{\%} CI 1.21-5.04). There were no differences in rates of other adverse events. Conclusions: Among healthy physically active individuals, statin use was associated with doubled the odds of diabetes and diabetic complications without countervailing cardiovascular benefits.",
keywords = "Diabetes, Diabetic complications, Physical activity, Primary prevention, Statin",
author = "Mansi, {Ishak A.} and English, {Jenny L.} and Morris, {Michael J.} and Song Zhang and Mortensen, {Eric M.} and Halm, {Ethan A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.075",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Statins for primary prevention in physically active individuals

T2 - Do the risks outweigh the benefits?

AU - Mansi, Ishak A.

AU - English, Jenny L.

AU - Morris, Michael J.

AU - Zhang, Song

AU - Mortensen, Eric M.

AU - Halm, Ethan A.

PY - 2016/9/21

Y1 - 2016/9/21

N2 - Objectives: There are little data on the potential benefits and adverse events of statins among physically fit individuals. Our objective was to examine the associations of statin use with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes and adverse events in active duty military (a surrogate for high level of physical fitness). Design: This is a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study of healthy active duty military (fiscal years [FY] 2002-2011). Methods: Statin-users received statins during FY 2005 as their only prescription medication. FY 2002-2004 was used to describe baseline characteristics; and FY 2006-2011were used to capture outcomes. Study outcomes included major acute cardiovascular events (MACE), diabetes mellitus and its complications, kidney diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, obesity, and malignancy. Results: We propensity score matched 837 statin-users to 2488 nonusers. During follow-up, 1.6% statin-users and 1.5% nonusers were diagnosed with MACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.98), 12.5% of statin-users and 5.8% of nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.79-3.04), and 1.7% statin- users and 0.7% nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes with complication (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.21-5.04). There were no differences in rates of other adverse events. Conclusions: Among healthy physically active individuals, statin use was associated with doubled the odds of diabetes and diabetic complications without countervailing cardiovascular benefits.

AB - Objectives: There are little data on the potential benefits and adverse events of statins among physically fit individuals. Our objective was to examine the associations of statin use with beneficial cardiovascular outcomes and adverse events in active duty military (a surrogate for high level of physical fitness). Design: This is a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study of healthy active duty military (fiscal years [FY] 2002-2011). Methods: Statin-users received statins during FY 2005 as their only prescription medication. FY 2002-2004 was used to describe baseline characteristics; and FY 2006-2011were used to capture outcomes. Study outcomes included major acute cardiovascular events (MACE), diabetes mellitus and its complications, kidney diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, obesity, and malignancy. Results: We propensity score matched 837 statin-users to 2488 nonusers. During follow-up, 1.6% statin-users and 1.5% nonusers were diagnosed with MACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.98), 12.5% of statin-users and 5.8% of nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.79-3.04), and 1.7% statin- users and 0.7% nonusers were diagnosed with diabetes with complication (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.21-5.04). There were no differences in rates of other adverse events. Conclusions: Among healthy physically active individuals, statin use was associated with doubled the odds of diabetes and diabetic complications without countervailing cardiovascular benefits.

KW - Diabetes

KW - Diabetic complications

KW - Physical activity

KW - Primary prevention

KW - Statin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011578902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011578902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.075

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.075

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

ER -