Stereotactic body radiation therapy in multiple organ sites

Robert D. Timmerman, Brian D. Kavanagh, L. Chinsoo Cho, Lech Papiez, Lei Xing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

288 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) uses advanced technology to deliver a potent ablative dose to deep-seated tumors in the lung, liver, spine, pancreas, kidney, and prostate. Methods: SBRT involves constructing very compact high-dose volumes in and about the tumor. Tumor position must be accurately assessed throughout treatment, especially for tumors that move with respiration. Sophisticated image guidance and related treatment delivery technologies have developed to account for such motion and efficiently deliver high daily dose. All this serves to allow the delivery of ablative dose fractionation to the target capable of both disrupting tumor mitosis and cellular function. Results: Prospective phase I dose-escalation trials have been carried out to reach potent tumoricidal dose levels capable of eradicating tumors with high likelihood. These studies indicate a clear dose-response relationship for tumor control with escalating dose of SBRT. Prospective phase II studies have been reported from several continents consistently showing very high levels of local tumor control. Although late toxicity requires further careful assessment, acute and subacute toxicities are generally acceptable. Patterns of toxicity, both clinical and radiographic, are distinct from those observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy as a result of the unique biologic response to ablative fractionation. Conclusion: Prospective trials using SBRT have confirmed the efficacy of treatment in a variety of patient populations. Although mechanisms of ablative-dose injury remain elusive, ongoing prospective trials offer the hope of finding the ideal application for SBRT in the treatment arsenal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)947-952
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2007

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Radiotherapy
Neoplasms
Dose Fractionation
Technology
Mitosis
Prostate
Pancreas
Respiration
Spine
Therapeutics
Kidney
Lung
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stereotactic body radiation therapy in multiple organ sites. / Timmerman, Robert D.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Papiez, Lech; Xing, Lei.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 25, No. 8, 10.03.2007, p. 947-952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Timmerman, Robert D. ; Kavanagh, Brian D. ; Cho, L. Chinsoo ; Papiez, Lech ; Xing, Lei. / Stereotactic body radiation therapy in multiple organ sites. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 947-952.
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