Stevens-Johnson syndrome in children.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

During a 22-year period 51 cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) occurred in infants and children who ranged in age from 3 months to 14 years. Fifty-six percent of patients had an antecedent upper respiratory tract infection or non-specific viral infection, and 67% had received a prescription medication in the 3 weeks before onset of SJS. Nineteen patients (37%) were treated with adrenocorticosteroid medication during their hospitalization. Age, sex, duration of illness, body temperature on admission and history of antecedent medication were similar for the steroid- and non-steroid-treated patients. Rates of infection and overall complications were significantly greater in steroid-treated patients than in those treated symptomatically. These observations suggest that steroid drugs should not be used for treatment of SJS in infants and children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-158
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease
Volume1
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1982

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Stevens-Johnson Syndrome
Steroids
Virus Diseases
Body Temperature
Respiratory Tract Infections
Prescriptions
Hospitalization
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stevens-Johnson syndrome in children. / Ginsburg, C. M.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease, Vol. 1, No. 3, 05.1982, p. 155-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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