Stigma never dies: Mourning a spouse who died of AIDS in China

Nancy Xiaonan Yu, Amy Y M Chow, Cecilia L W Chan, Jianxin Zhang, Sunita M. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stigma towards people with HIV (PHIV) can affect their family members. In this study of 68 HIV seronegative participants in China whose spouse died of AIDS, 35.3% reported prolonged grief. Stigma beliefs towards PHIV (i.e., belief that PHIV's death leaves the deceased, the family and society better off) predicted grief symptoms. Social campaigns to combat stigma and grief therapy to reconstruct the meaning of HIV-related death may be helpful to reduce suffering in HIV bereaved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)968-970
Number of pages3
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume230
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Grief
Spouses
China
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Family Leave

Keywords

  • Bereavement
  • Prolonged grief
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Stigma never dies : Mourning a spouse who died of AIDS in China. / Yu, Nancy Xiaonan; Chow, Amy Y M; Chan, Cecilia L W; Zhang, Jianxin; Stewart, Sunita M.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 230, No. 3, 2015, p. 968-970.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Nancy Xiaonan ; Chow, Amy Y M ; Chan, Cecilia L W ; Zhang, Jianxin ; Stewart, Sunita M. / Stigma never dies : Mourning a spouse who died of AIDS in China. In: Psychiatry Research. 2015 ; Vol. 230, No. 3. pp. 968-970.
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