Subclinical thyroid disease and the incidence of hypertension in pregnancy

Karen L. Wilson, Brian M. Casey, Donald D. McIntire, Lisa M. Halvorson, F. Gary Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the possibility of long-term effects of subclinical thyroid dysfunction on hypertension and other cardiovascular-related conditions during pregnancy. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a prospective prenatal population-based study in which serum thyroid-function analytes were measured from November 2000 through April 2003. Women with evidence of overt thyroid disease were excluded. The remaining women were classified as being euthyroid, having subclinical hyperthyroid, or having subclinical hypothyroid, and the frequency of pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders was compared between these groups. Results: Pregnancy outcomes in 24,883 women were analyzed for pregnancy hypertension, classified as gestational hypertension, mild preeclampsia, or severe preeclampsia. The incidence of hypertensive disorders were compared between the three cohorts. The overall incidences of hypertension in pregnancy were 6.2%, 8.5%, and 10.9% in the subclinical hyperthyroid, euthyroid, and subclinical hypothyroid groups, respectively, and were found to be significant when unadjusted (P=.016). After adjusting for confounding factors, there was a significant association between subclinical hypothyroidism and severe preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.4; P=.03). Conclusion: Women with subclinical hypothyroidism identified during pregnancy have an increased risk for severe preeclampsia when compared with euthyroid women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-320
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume119
Issue number2 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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Thyroid Diseases
Pre-Eclampsia
Hypertension
Pregnancy
Incidence
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism
Thyroid Gland
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Pregnancy Outcome
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Subclinical thyroid disease and the incidence of hypertension in pregnancy. / Wilson, Karen L.; Casey, Brian M.; McIntire, Donald D.; Halvorson, Lisa M.; Cunningham, F. Gary.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 119, No. 2 PART 1, 02.2012, p. 315-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, Karen L. ; Casey, Brian M. ; McIntire, Donald D. ; Halvorson, Lisa M. ; Cunningham, F. Gary. / Subclinical thyroid disease and the incidence of hypertension in pregnancy. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 119, No. 2 PART 1. pp. 315-320.
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