Super-resolution microscopy using normal flow decoding and geometric constraints

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior knowledge about the observed scene provides the key to restoration of frequencies beyond the bandpass of an imaging system (super-resolution). In conjunction with microscopy two super-resolution mechanisms have been mainly reported: analytic continuation of the frequency spectrum, and constrained image deconvolution. This paper describes an alternative approach to super-resolution. Prior knowledge is imposed through geometric and dynamic models of the scene. We illustrate our concept based on the stereo reconstruction of a micropipette moving in close proximity to a stationary target object. Information about the shape and the movement of the pipette is incorporated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm was tested in a microrobot environment, where the pipette tip was tracked at sub-Rayleigh distances to the target. Based on the tracking results, a machine vision module controlled the manipulation of microscopic objects, e.g. latex beads or diamond mono-crystals. In the theoretical part of this paper we prove that knowledge of the form 'The pipette has moved between two consecutive frames of the movie' must result in a twofold increase in resolution. We used the normal flow of an image sequence to decode positional measures from motion evidence. In practice, super-resolution factors between 3 and 5 were obtained. The additional gain originates from the geometric constraints that were imposed upon the stereo reconstruction of the pipette axis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-149
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Microscopy
Volume204
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

pipettes
decoding
Decoding
Microscopy
Microscopic examination
microscopy
Diamond
Deconvolution
Motion Pictures
Latexes
Microspheres
Imaging systems
Computer vision
Restoration
Dynamic models
Diamonds
Crystals
computer vision
latex
dynamic models

Keywords

  • Geometric constraints
  • Machine vision control
  • Normal flow
  • Stereo light microscopy
  • Super-resolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Super-resolution microscopy using normal flow decoding and geometric constraints. / Danuser, G.

In: Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 204, No. 2, 2001, p. 136-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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