Surgical management of complex post-tuberculous kyphosis among African patients: clinical and radiographic outcomes for a consecutive series treated at a single institution in West Africa

FOCOS Spine Research Group

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Abstract

Study design: Retrospective review of consecutive series. Objective: To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes after surgical management of post-tuberculous kyphosis. Summary of background data: Post-tuberculous (TB) kyphosis can lead to progressive pulmonary and neurological deterioration. Surgery is indicated to decompress neural elements and correct the spine deformity. Although posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) has been established as the treatment of choice for severe TB kyphosis, there is paucity of studies on the clinical outcomes among patients treated in West Africa. Methods: Clinical and radiographic data of 57 patients (pts) who underwent surgical correction of post-TB kyphosis at a single site in West Africa between 2013 and 2018 (≥ 2-year follow-up in 36 pts, ≥ 1-year FU in 21 pts). Pre- and post-op SRS scores and radiographic outcomes were compared using Paired t test. Results: 57 patients, 36M:21F. Mean age 19 (11–57 years). 22/57 pts (39.3%) underwent pre-op halo gravity traction (HGT) for an average duration of 86 days (8–144 days). HGT pts had a higher baseline regional kyphosis (125.1 ± 20.9) compared to non-HGT pts (64.6 ± 31.8, p < 0.001). Post-HGT regional kyphosis corrected to 101.2 ± 23 (24° correction). 53 pts (92.9%) underwent posterior-only surgery and 4 (7.0%) combined anterior–posterior surgery. 39 (68.4%) had PVCR, 11 (19.3%) PSO, and 16 (28.1%) thoracoplasty. Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) signal changes occurred in 23/57 pts (≈ 40%), dural tear in 5 pts (8.8%), pleural tear in 3 pts (5.3%), ureteric injury in 1 pt (1.7%), and vascular injury in 1 pt (1.7%). Post-op complications included four (7.0%) infection, three (5.3%) implant related, two (3.5%) radiographic (one PJK and one DJK), one (1.7%) neurologic, one (1.7%) wound problem, and two (3.5%) sacral ulcers. IOM changes were similar in the VCR (48.7%) and non-VCR (23.5%) pts, p > 0.05. Complication rates were similar among HGT and non-HGT groups. Significant improvements from baseline were seen in the average SRS Total and domains scores and radiographic measurements for patients who attained 2-year follow-up. Conclusion: PVCR ± HGT can provide safe and optimal correction in cases of severe post-TB kyphosis with good clinical and radiographic outcomes in underserved regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)777-788
Number of pages12
JournalSpine deformity
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Halo gravity traction
  • Post-TB kyphosis
  • Underserved regions
  • Vertebral column resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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