Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Current Best Practice and Future Direction

Fasiha Kanwal, Amit Singal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and the fastest growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The overall prognosis of HCC remains dismal, except for the subset of patients who are diagnosed at early stage and receive potentially curative therapies, such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. Given this, expert society guidelines recommend HCC surveillance every 6 months in at-risk individuals. Despite these recommendations, the effectiveness of HCC surveillance remains a subject of debate. We discuss current best practices for HCC surveillance and the evidence that support these recommendations. We also describe several initiatives that are underway to improve HCC surveillance and outline areas that may serve as high-yield targets for future research. Overall, we believe these efforts will help the field move toward precision surveillance, where surveillance tests and intervals are tailored to individual HCC risk. Doing so can maximize surveillance benefits, minimize surveillance harms, and optimize overall value for all patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-64
Number of pages11
JournalGastroenterology
Volume157
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Liver Neoplasms
Practice Guidelines
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Direction compound
Liver Transplantation
Cause of Death
Neoplasms
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma : Current Best Practice and Future Direction. / Kanwal, Fasiha; Singal, Amit.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 157, No. 1, 01.07.2019, p. 54-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{eb40a2b8eab54dfa8eb98507f104b313,
title = "Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current Best Practice and Future Direction",
abstract = "Hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and the fastest growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The overall prognosis of HCC remains dismal, except for the subset of patients who are diagnosed at early stage and receive potentially curative therapies, such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. Given this, expert society guidelines recommend HCC surveillance every 6 months in at-risk individuals. Despite these recommendations, the effectiveness of HCC surveillance remains a subject of debate. We discuss current best practices for HCC surveillance and the evidence that support these recommendations. We also describe several initiatives that are underway to improve HCC surveillance and outline areas that may serve as high-yield targets for future research. Overall, we believe these efforts will help the field move toward precision surveillance, where surveillance tests and intervals are tailored to individual HCC risk. Doing so can maximize surveillance benefits, minimize surveillance harms, and optimize overall value for all patients.",
author = "Fasiha Kanwal and Amit Singal",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1053/j.gastro.2019.02.049",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "157",
pages = "54--64",
journal = "Gastroenterology",
issn = "0016-5085",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

T2 - Current Best Practice and Future Direction

AU - Kanwal, Fasiha

AU - Singal, Amit

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and the fastest growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The overall prognosis of HCC remains dismal, except for the subset of patients who are diagnosed at early stage and receive potentially curative therapies, such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. Given this, expert society guidelines recommend HCC surveillance every 6 months in at-risk individuals. Despite these recommendations, the effectiveness of HCC surveillance remains a subject of debate. We discuss current best practices for HCC surveillance and the evidence that support these recommendations. We also describe several initiatives that are underway to improve HCC surveillance and outline areas that may serve as high-yield targets for future research. Overall, we believe these efforts will help the field move toward precision surveillance, where surveillance tests and intervals are tailored to individual HCC risk. Doing so can maximize surveillance benefits, minimize surveillance harms, and optimize overall value for all patients.

AB - Hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and the fastest growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The overall prognosis of HCC remains dismal, except for the subset of patients who are diagnosed at early stage and receive potentially curative therapies, such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. Given this, expert society guidelines recommend HCC surveillance every 6 months in at-risk individuals. Despite these recommendations, the effectiveness of HCC surveillance remains a subject of debate. We discuss current best practices for HCC surveillance and the evidence that support these recommendations. We also describe several initiatives that are underway to improve HCC surveillance and outline areas that may serve as high-yield targets for future research. Overall, we believe these efforts will help the field move toward precision surveillance, where surveillance tests and intervals are tailored to individual HCC risk. Doing so can maximize surveillance benefits, minimize surveillance harms, and optimize overall value for all patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067207897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067207897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.gastro.2019.02.049

DO - 10.1053/j.gastro.2019.02.049

M3 - Review article

VL - 157

SP - 54

EP - 64

JO - Gastroenterology

JF - Gastroenterology

SN - 0016-5085

IS - 1

ER -